Enabling easy access to DNA sequence information

May 10, 2010

Hinxton, 10 May 2010 - The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) is launched today, consolidating three major sequence resources to become Europe's primary access point to globally comprehensive DNA and RNA sequence information. The ENA is freely available from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), a part of European Molecular Biology Laboratory.

Faster and cheaper DNA sequencing has led to previously unimaginable amounts of data being deposited in the public nucleotide sequence databases: today, ENA holds over 20 terabases of nucleotide sequence which, combined with associated information (annotation), occupies 230 terabytes of disk space. Carefully annotated and crosslinked sequence records from the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (EMBL-Bank) form the backbone of the ENA. But importantly, ENA now also provides direct access to raw sequence data: the European Trace Archive contains raw data from electrophoresis-based sequencing machines and was previously maintained at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute; the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) is a newly established repository for raw data from next-generation (array-based) sequencing platforms. Improved submission and data-access tools make it easier for ENA's users to share their sequence data.

"Large-scale DNA sequencing was previously the domain of a small number of specialist labs, but next-generation sequencing has made it accessible to the majority of molecular life scientists," explains Graham Cameron, the EMBL-EBI's Associate Director. "The launch of ENA reflects our continuing commitment to promoting scientific progress by providing global access to nucleotide sequence information. This has been central to EMBL's mission since the 1980s when we launched the EMBL Data Library."

Guy Cochrane, who leads the ENA team, stated that "ENA has been designed to provide our users with improved access both to annotated and to raw sequence data through the same user-friendly interface. It provides graphical browsing, web services, text search and a new rapid sequence similarity search. ENA also provides access to related information, with over 190 million cross references to external records, many of which are in other EMBL-EBI data resources."

The ENA team plans to launch many new features for the resource over the next twelve months, including enhancements to the user-friendly browser, improved interactive submissions tools and organism- and project-centred portals into ENA data.

Tim Hubbard, Head of Informatics at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, said: "As major generators of DNA sequence data, it is important to us that the research community has ready access not only to annotated sequence information, but also to raw data. It's great to see the launch of ENA with new interfaces for users to this vast and rapidly growing body of information." Funding for the ENA is provided by EMBL, the Wellcome Trust and SLING, a Framework Programme 7 project coordinated by the EMBL-EBI and funded by the European Commission.
-end-
European Nucleotide Archive: www.ebi.ac.uk/ena

European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Related Data Articles from Brightsurf:

Keep the data coming
A continuous data supply ensures data-intensive simulations can run at maximum speed.

Astronomers are bulging with data
For the first time, over 250 million stars in our galaxy's bulge have been surveyed in near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light, opening the door for astronomers to reexamine key questions about the Milky Way's formation and history.

Novel method for measuring spatial dependencies turns less data into more data
Researcher makes 'little data' act big through, the application of mathematical techniques normally used for time-series, to spatial processes.

Ups and downs in COVID-19 data may be caused by data reporting practices
As data accumulates on COVID-19 cases and deaths, researchers have observed patterns of peaks and valleys that repeat on a near-weekly basis.

Data centers use less energy than you think
Using the most detailed model to date of global data center energy use, researchers found that massive efficiency gains by data centers have kept energy use roughly flat over the past decade.

Storing data in music
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for embedding data in music and transmitting it to a smartphone.

Life data economics: calling for new models to assess the value of human data
After the collapse of the blockchain bubble a number of research organisations are developing platforms to enable individual ownership of life data and establish the data valuation and pricing models.

Geoscience data group urges all scientific disciplines to make data open and accessible
Institutions, science funders, data repositories, publishers, researchers and scientific societies from all scientific disciplines must work together to ensure all scientific data are easy to find, access and use, according to a new commentary in Nature by members of the Enabling FAIR Data Steering Committee.

Democratizing data science
MIT researchers are hoping to advance the democratization of data science with a new tool for nonstatisticians that automatically generates models for analyzing raw data.

Getting the most out of atmospheric data analysis
An international team including researchers from Kanazawa University used a new approach to analyze an atmospheric data set spanning 18 years for the investigation of new-particle formation.

Read More: Data News and Data Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.