Access to care leads Americans' priorities in first-ever public study of health value

May 12, 2009

WASHINGTON, DC (May 12, 2009) - When Americans were asked to value the most important of dozens of health products and services as they consider spending their own money, they chose access to care over everything else, a new study revealed.

The Spectrum Health Value Study™, the first publicly available longitudinal study of its kind, queried a representative sample of Americans over the past six months on the value of health services, products or programs from a personal financial decision-making perspective. The study's sponsor, Spectrum, a Washington, DC-based health and science communications firm, released results of the first two waves of data collection as the national dialogue on health care reform gains momentum. Conducted by New York-based Russell Research in conjunction with Spectrum, the ongoing online study requires respondents to make a series of choices among a standard list of 27 services and products.

Respondents overwhelmingly identified access to physician services, medical services at a hospital and emergency care services, in that order, as their highest valued health priorities. The least valued health services included psychiatric services, vocational rehabilitation, services for mental retardation and substance abuse.

"Health reformers cannot afford to overlook how everyday constituents, when faced with difficult trade-offs, place a relative value on health services and products as they would spend their own money," said John J. Seng, president and CEO of Spectrum in explaining the health consulting firm's interest in conducting the study. "With this new information, a vital piece of the health reform debate falls into place," added Seng.

"We learned that most Americans agree that they contribute in some way or another to resources for health care, and when considering how they would spend their money, it's all about access to care," said Audrey Spolarich, Spectrum's senior advisor for research. "Americans ranked access significantly higher than all other products and services, such as preventive health care or mental health care," added Spolarich.

The Spectrum Health Value Study™ detailed findings may be found at www.healthvaluestudy.com. Spectrum plans to continue querying samples of Americans on their health values and make available findings on a quarterly basis.

Additional Study findings:
-end-
About the Spectrum Health Value Study

The Study is being fielded online using the Max-Diff methodology every quarter for the long-term. During each phase of the study, approximately 1,000 respondents are surveyed about a set of health care products and services. For each random set of four products and services, the respondent is asked to identify which in each group they value most, and which they value least. A statistical algorithm compiles the responses. The results indicate the health care products and service the American consumer values most or least when spending their own health care dollars. The data collection and tabulations are being conducted by Russell Research, a leader in online and market research.

The Spectrum Health Value Study™ is a trademark of Spectrum. The study is funded solely through an equity investment by Spectrum and receives no external organization or corporate support. Spectrum (www.spectrumscience.com) is committed to achieving the goals of clients who are involved with issues, products, provider services or research in life and human health sciences.

Spectrum

Related Health Care Articles from Brightsurf:

Study evaluates new World Health Organization Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers
The World Health Organization developed the new Labor Care Guide to support clinicians in providing good quality, women-centered care during labor and childbirth.

Six ways primary care "medical homes" are lowering health care spending
New analysis of 394 U.S. primary care practices identifies the aspects of care delivery that are associated with lower health care spending and lower utilization of emergency care and hospital admissions.

Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs
Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.

Spending on primary care vs. other US health care expenditures
National health care survey data were used to assess the amount of money spent on primary care relative to other areas of health care spending in the US from 2002 to 2016.

MU Health Care neurologist publishes guidance related to COVID-19 and stroke care
A University of Missouri Health Care neurologist has published more than 40 new recommendations for evaluating and treating stroke patients based on international research examining the link between stroke and novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

Large federal program aimed at providing better health care underfunds primary care
Despite a mandate to help patients make better-informed health care decisions, a ten-year research program established under the Affordable Care Act has funded a relatively small number of studies that examine primary care, the setting where the majority of patients in the US receive treatment.

International medical graduates care for Medicare patients with greater health care needs
A study by a Massachusetts General Hospital research team indicates that internal medicine physicians who are graduates of medical schools outside the US care for Medicare patients with more complex medical needs than those cared for by graduates of American medical schools.

The Lancet Global Health: Improved access to care not sufficient to improve health, as epidemic of poor quality care revealed
Of the 8.6 million deaths from conditions treatable by health care, poor-quality care is responsible for an estimated 5 million deaths per year -- more than deaths due to insufficient access to care (3.6 million) .

Under Affordable Care Act, Americans have had more preventive care for heart health
By reducing out-of-pocket costs for preventive treatment, the Affordable Care Act appears to have encouraged more people to have health screenings related to their cardiovascular health.

High-deductible health care plans curb both cost and usage, including preventive care
A team of researchers based at IUPUI has conducted the first systematic review of studies examining the relationship between high-deductible health care plans and the use of health care services.

Read More: Health Care News and Health Care Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.