ERJ Open Research -- a new society-led open-access respiratory journal

May 12, 2014

The European Respiratory Society has announced the launch of a new open access research journal, ERJ Open Research. The journal will publish high-quality original work across the whole spectrum of respiratory medicine, covering basic, translational and clinical research, and provide a high-quality yet affordable open access option to authors, with discounts targeted to society members and researchers in low-income countries.

ERJ Open Research will provide key benefits to authors and readers alike: ERS Publications Committee Chair Wisia Wedzicha, Professor of Respiratory Medicine at the National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, said: "I'm very excited to announce this launch. The ERS is able to call upon the best editors and reviewers in the respiratory field, together with the support of the society's dedicated publishing office, in order to produce a rigorous, high-quality journal.

"We are already committed to supporting open access publishing through the European Respiratory Journal's open access option and the fully open access European Respiratory Review and Breathe. The launch of ERJ Open Research underlines that commitment and gives the society a comprehensive open access offering."

ERS President Professor Peter Barnes said: "ERJ Open Research represents a major step forward in the European Respiratory Society's efforts to improve respiratory health by disseminating the latest knowledge to medical and scientific communities across the world. By providing free or reduced fees to authors from lower-income countries, the journal will also give those researchers the access they need - and deserve - to rigorous peer review and high-quality production of their work."
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To find out more and subscribe to email updates, visit http://www.ersjournals.com/site/ERJopenres/index.xhtml

European Lung Foundation

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