Nav: Home

The world's first wireless satellite

May 12, 2016

Professor Sergio Montenegro and his fellow researcher Tobias Mikschl have reason to be happy: A few days ago, the two computer scientists from the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, took to the podium in Berlin - as the overall winners of the INNOspace Masters competition and as winners of the category "DLR Space Administration Challenge". DLR is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

What the price was awarded for: Montenegro and Mikschl developed Skith, a technology for the world's first wireless satellite. Previously, all single components of a satellite had to be interconnected using electric cables. Skith has changed that by using miniaturised high-speed real-time radio modules with short ranges. This reduces design effort and costs while boosting the satellite's technical reliability and flexibility.

Test in space planned for 2018

"The system is ready and waiting in our labs to be tested in space under real conditions," says Mikschl. In 2018 already, Skith could hitch a ride on a satellite to be launched into space, allowing the system to prove how well it functions under real conditions.

Skith stands for "skip the harness". As a reward for their innovation, Montenegro and Mikschl received a certificate, a satellite-shaped trophy and the invitation to apply for money with the DLR to fund new projects.

Facts about the competition

The DLR has organised the competition for the first time. Under the motto "Satellite 4.0", participants were invited to submit suggestions and concepts for the future of aeronautics. 50 companies, universities and research institutions from eight European countries participated. In the end, nine finalists in three competition categories convinced the jury with their ideas. The awards ceremony took place at the INNOspace Masters Conference in Berlin on 4 May 2016.

The competition is organised by DLR Space Administration on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. The competition is part of the INNOspace initiative that has promoted innovations and technology transfers between astronautics and other industry sectors since 2013.
-end-


University of Würzburg

Related Satellite Articles:

Satellite images reveal global poverty
How far have we come in achieving the UN's sustainable development goals that we are committed to nationally and internationally?
Satellite data exposes looting
Globally archaeological heritage is under threat by looting. The destruction of archaeological sites obliterates the basis for our understanding of ancient cultures and we lose our shared human past.
NASA satellite finds 16W now subtropical
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found 16W was still being battered by wind shear after transitioning into an extra-tropical cyclone.
How far to go for satellite cloud image forecasting into operation
Simulated satellite cloud images not only have the visualization of cloud imagery, but also can reflect more information about the model.
NASA confirms re-discovered IMAGE satellite
The identity of the satellite re-discovered on Jan. 20, 2018, has been confirmed as NASA's IMAGE satellite.
More Satellite News and Satellite Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...