Nav: Home

Study identifies a new test to predict severity of inflammatory bowel disease in children

May 12, 2017

(Prague, May 13, 2017) The results from a Norwegian study show that a new genetic test for characterising intestinal microbiota may help to diagnose inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and predict which children will develop the most extensive disease and need early, aggressive intervention.

Researchers from Oslo, Norway today presented the results of a study that evaluated faecal microbiota profiles in more than 100 newly-diagnosed children with IBD and found a clear distinction between the profiles of these children and a healthy comparator group (1). The researchers also found that children with the most disturbed microbiota profiles (dysbiosis) had the most extensive IBD and were more likely to need biological therapy in the future.

Speaking at the annual meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) in Prague, lead researcher, Dr Christine Olbjørn from the Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine at Akershus University Hospital in Oslo said the study indicates that this type of profiling could be clinically useful in paediatric practice and long-term patient care.

"IBD is often far more aggressive in children than it is in adults but it is very difficult to predict the individual disease course" she said. "We and other researchers are interested in the potential of faecal microbiota profiling to help us diagnose and manage these children and we have been helped by the availability of new genetic tests that can quantify different bacterial species in the gut."

Latest study findings

To undertake the study, Dr Olbjørn and colleagues from other specialist centres in Norway collected faecal samples from 235 children and adolescents (80 children with Crohn's disease, 27 with ulcerative colitis, three with unclassified IBD, 50 with symptoms, but no IBD diagnosis, and 75 healthy children). The samples were analysed using a new test called the GA-map™ IBD Dysbiosis Test (2), which uses advanced DNA profiling to identify up to 300 different bacteria on different taxonomic levels. The microbiota profiles were then compared between the children with IBD, those with symptoms but no IBD diagnosis, and healthy children.

"We found that the probe signal intensity, which indicates the abundance of different bacterial species, was significantly reduced in the children with IBD and those with symptoms, but no IBD, compared to the healthy children", explained Dr Olbjørn. "What was perhaps more intriguing was that the children with more extensive IBD had significantly more Clostridiales, and those with extensive Crohn's disease had more Proteobacteria than children with limited disease. Children who were subsequently treated with TNF blockers had a lower diversity of Firmicutes, Tenericutes and Bacteroidetes as well as lower abundance of Actinobacteria before treatment than those who were ultimately treated with conventional medications."

Dr Olbjørn believes that the results of this study add further support to the view that gut microbial dysbiosis play a key role in the pathogenesis of IBD in children. "Our findings suggest that faecal microbiota profiles may be used to identify which children are destined for a more severe form of IBD and which, therefore, need more intensive monitoring and possibly earlier, more aggressive treatment."
-end-
Notes to Editors

For further information, or to speak to an ESPGHAN expert, please email media@espghan.org or call James M. Butcher on +44 (0) 1444 811 099.

Download an infographic on Paediatric IBD here: http://www.espghancongress.org/congress-information/press-information/

About Dr Christine Olbjørn

Dr Olbjørn is a paediatric gastroenterologist, and has worked as a consultant at Akershus University Hospital outside of Oslo for several years. Her main interest is IBD- from diagnosis, treatment and follow-up, including transition of care from adolescence to adulthood. She is currently teaching medical students in paediatrics and working on her PhD thesis which elaborates on prognosis in IBD and how to improve individualised and personalised care.

About ESPGHAN

The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) is a multi-professional organisation whose aim is to promote the health of children with special attention to the gastrointestinal tract, liver and nutritional status, through knowledge creation, the dissemination of science based information, the promotion of best practice in the delivery of care and the provision of high quality education for paediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition professionals in Europe and beyond. Find out more by visiting http://www.espghan.org

About the 50th Annual Meeting of ESPGHAN

The 50th Annual Meeting of ESPGHAN is taking place from Wednesday 10 to Saturday 13 May 2017, in Prague, Czech Republic.

Every year the ESPGHAN meeting attracts the key opinion leaders in the field of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition from across Europe and all five continents, turning it into the largest conference of its kind worldwide. The Annual Meeting attracts over 4,000 experts from over 100 countries, all operating in the fields of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, turning it into the largest conference of its kind worldwide. This year the meeting has received a record number of 839 accepted abstracts.

References

1. Olbjørn C, Småstuen MC, Thiis-Evensen E et al. Faecal microbiota profiles at diagnosis in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Prediction of disease severity and subsequent need of biologic therapy. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Prague, Czech Republic, 13 May, 2017.

2. Casén C, Vebø HC, Sekelja M et al. Deviations in human gut microbiota: a novel diagnostic test for determining dysbiosis in patients with IBS or IBD. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2015;42(1):71-83.

Spink Health

Related Children Articles:

How many children is enough?
Most Russians would like to have two children: a boy and a girl.
Preterm children have similar temperament to children who were institutionally deprived
A child's temperament is affected by the early stages of their life.
Only-children more likely to be obese than children with siblings
Families with multiple children tend to make more healthy eating decisions than families with a single child.
Children living in countryside outperform children living in metropolitan area in motor skills
Residential density is related to children's motor skills, engagement in outdoor play and organised sports. that Finnish children living in the countryside spent more time outdoors and had better motor skills than their age peers in the metropolitan area.
Hispanic and black children more likely to miss school due to eczema than white children
In a study that highlights racial disparities in the everyday impact of eczema, new research shows Hispanic and black children are more likely than white children to miss school due to the chronic skin disease.
Children, their parents, and health professionals often underestimate children's higher weight status
More than half of parents underestimated their children's classification as overweight or obese -- children themselves and health professionals also share this misperception, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, UK (April 28-May 1).
Children with autism are in 'in-tune' with mom's feelings like other children
New research addresses limitations of prior autism spectrum disorder (ASD) studies on facial emotion recognition by using five distinct facial emotions in unfamiliar and familiar (mom) faces to test the influence of familiarity in children with and without ASD.
First Nations children and youth experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children
First Nations children and youth are experiencing more pain than non-First Nations children, but do not access specialist or mental health services at the same rate as their non-First Nations peers, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Grandparents: Raising their children's children, they get the job done
Millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents, with numbers continuing to climb as the opioid crisis and other factors disrupt families.
How do you assess pain in children who can't express themselves? New research identifies priorities in identifying pain in nonverbal children with medical complexity
Pain is a frequent problem for children with complex medical conditions -- but many of them are unable to communicate their pain verbally.
More Children News and Children Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.