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Is pulmonary rehab after hospitalization for COPD associated with better survival?

May 12, 2020

What The Study Did: Claims data for nearly 200,000 Medicare patients were used to examine the association between starting pulmonary rehabilitation within 90 days of being hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and survival after one year. Pulmonary rehabilitation involves exercise training and self-management education.

Authors: Peter K. Lindenauer, M.D., M.Sc., of the University of Massachusetts Medical School-Baystate, Springfield, Massachusetts, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4437)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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Media advisory: The full study and editorial are linked to this news release.

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