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Is being bullied as teen associated with growing up in areas of income inequality?

May 13, 2019

Bottom Line: A survey study of about 874,000 adolescents from 40 European and North American countries suggests growing up in areas with income inequality was associated with being bullied after accounting for some other mitigating factors. The study didn't contain individial-level or school-level data that might help to explain the observed association with bullying, which was self-reported and uncorroborated. Study authors says more research is needed to understand why children who grow up in economically unequal area may be at greater risk.

Authors: Frank J. Elgar, Ph.D., of McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.1181)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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JAMA Pediatrics

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