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Characteristics, outcomes of heart transplant recipients with COVID-19

May 13, 2020

What The Review Says: The characteristics, treatment and outcomes of heart transplant recipients who were infected with COVID-19 in New York City are described in this case series.

Authors: Nir Uriel, M.D., M.Sc., of Columbia University Irving Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.2159)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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Media advisory: The full article is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamacardio.2020.2159?guestAccessKey=2a37327f-2de5-4ff8-9de0-138f637b98b1&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=051320

JAMA Cardiology

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