Symposium focuses on curable cancer that affects young men

May 14, 2008

The latest information on the biology and treatment of testicular cancer, the most common cancer among young men, will be presented at the Symposium on Testicular Cancer organized by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), to be held on 15-16 May in Munich, Germany.

"Testicular cancer is the most common tumor in men between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five and has seen the strongest increase in incidence among all cancer types over the last 20 years," said the Symposium's Scientific Chair Prof. Hans-Joachim Schmoll, Director of the Department of Internal Medicine for oncology and hematology at the Martin Luther University Halle and former president of the German association for medical oncology (AIO).

Currently, testicular cancer affects one in every 100 men per year in Europe. The causes of the dramatic rise in incidence remain unclear.

The cure rate for testicular cancer has increased dramatically in recent years, thanks to improvements in chemotherapy. As a result, the treatment strategies in virtually all stages of the disease have changed, away from aggressive surgical or radiation treatment to surveillance without treatment or minimal treatment for most patients in early stages and only limited chemotherapy in advanced stages.

"All these changes in treatment approach mean patients need highly informed and experienced doctors, both to give them the best advice on selecting optimal treatment and then to implement with expertise the adopted course," Prof. Schmoll continued.

The ESMO Symposium on Testicular Cancer will present cutting-edge information on the molecular background of testicular cancer. Sessions will focus on explaining the sensitivity of this tumor to chemotherapy, on prognostic factors and on practical decision-making options for individual patients. In particular, treatment options will be discussed against the background of the European Consensus Guidelines.

After the public meeting, the Symposium Faculty will convene for the ESMO International Consensus meeting on Testicular Tumors, to both elaborate several important topics in the field and to update the ESMO Clinical Recommendations (CR) on Testicular seminoma.

Highlights of the meeting include sessions on the biology of germ cell tumors, with presentations by J. Wolter Oosterhuis from the Netherlands and Ewa Rajpert-De Meyts from Denmark. Darren Feldman from the US will also present brand new data on why germ cell tumors are so platinum sensitive and some resistant.
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European Society for Medical Oncology

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