International Diabetes Federation gives grant to metabolic syndrome research project in Australia

May 14, 2008

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) BRIDGES translational research grant program will fund STOP Diabetes, a project to be implemented and studied in Australia. The STOP project is designed to reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes in women by encouraging healthy behaviours.

The STOP Diabetes project was created by investigators at the Jean Hailes Foundation for Women's Health to address the alarming increase in lifestyle related metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes (GDM). According to the investigators, greater insights into these preventable diseases are needed in order to identify barriers to behaviour change so that unhealthy behaviours can be modified. The research will include attention to understanding women's health beliefs, attitudes, and risk perception as well as their response to illness. Education and translation of the findings will be a priority for the project.

According to the International Diabetes Federation, metabolic syndrome is a cluster of the most dangerous risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Its early identification is very important to facilitate preventive action. Understanding how women perceive health problems like metabolic syndrome is a critical first step in designing educational programs that are effective.

"The IDF grant will make an important contribution in supporting multidisciplinary research directly relevant to clinical care (for the prevention and treatment of diabetes)," said Professor Helena Teede, Director of the Jean Hailes Research Group. "It will enable vital research into prevention of diabetes in high risk groups. It will also provide important information of optimising the health of those with established diabetes."

The Federation, through BRIDGES, is committed to converting research findings into useful practices for the provision of quality care and services delivered by healthcare providers. The diabetes education program being tested in Australia, along with the 10 other selected translational research projects, was chosen because of its innovative idea, demonstration of the potential for health care cost savings, sustainability plans and the opportunity for its results to be widely replicated in other settings.

"We know that early detection followed by treatment and education--particularly lifestyle intervention--is vital to halt the progression of the metabolic syndrome and safeguard the future health of women", said Dr. Linda Siminerio, Chair of the IDF BRIDGES Review Committee. "Learning more about how women perceive their risks in an important step. The STOP Diabetes study will help us gain insights and important information."
-end-
The International Diabetes Federation independently manages the BRIDGES program with an educational grant from Eli Lilly and Company and is committed to promoting diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide.

Media Contacts:

International Diabetes Federation, Kerrita McClaughlyn, Media Relations Manager, Email: media@idf.org Tel: +32-2-5431639; Mobile: +32 487 530 625.
Jean Hailes Foundation for Women's Health, Mrs. Aleeza Zohar, Media Office, aleeza.zohar@jeanhailes.org.au

Note to editors:

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is the global advocate for the over 250 million people with diabetes worldwide. It represents over 200 diabetes associations in more than 160 countries. Its mission is to promote diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide. The International Diabetes Federation is an NGO in official relations with the World Health Organization and an associated NGO with the United Nations Department of Public Information. The International Diabetes Federation leads the World Diabetes Day campaign. Additional information is available at www.idf.org.

BRIDGES is the global translational grant programme of the International Diabetes Federation. It solicits proposals that support cost effective and sustainable interventions that can be adopted in real world settings, for the prevention and control of diabetes. Projects should be based on interventions already proven to be effective in trials to prevent and treat diabetes, to improve care of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and delay its complications. The interventions proposed should have the potential to be widely disseminated to clinical practice, individuals and communities. For more information, visit http://www.idfbridges.org.

The Jean Hailes Foundation for Women's Health is an independent, not-for-profit national organisation, caring for the health and wellbeing of Australian women through education, research and clinical care. The Foundation is based in Clayton, Victoria and has close links with Monash University. Additional information is available at http://www.jeanhailes.org.au

International Diabetes Federation

Related Diabetes Articles from Brightsurf:

New diabetes medication reduced heart event risk in those with diabetes and kidney disease
Sotagliflozin - a type of medication known as an SGLT2 inhibitor primarily prescribed for Type 2 diabetes - reduces the risk of adverse cardiovascular events for patients with diabetes and kidney disease.

Diabetes drug boosts survival in patients with type 2 diabetes and COVID-19 pneumonia
Sitagliptin, a drug to lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetes, also improves survival in diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19, suggests a multicenter observational study in Italy.

Making sense of diabetes
Throughout her 38-year nursing career, Laurel Despins has progressed from a bedside nurse to a clinical nurse specialist and has worked in medical, surgical and cardiac intensive care units.

Helping teens with type 1 diabetes improve diabetes control with MyDiaText
Adolescence is a difficult period of development, made more complex for those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).

Diabetes-in-a-dish model uncovers new insights into the cause of type 2 diabetes
Researchers have developed a novel 'disease-in-a-dish' model to study the basic molecular factors that lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, uncovering the potential existence of major signaling defects both inside and outside of the classical insulin signaling cascade, and providing new perspectives on the mechanisms behind insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes and possibly opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics for the disease.

Tele-diabetes to manage new-onset diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic
Two new case studies highlight the use of tele-diabetes to manage new-onset type 1 diabetes in an adult and an infant during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Genetic profile may predict type 2 diabetes risk among women with gestational diabetes
Women who go on to develop type 2 diabetes after having gestational, or pregnancy-related, diabetes are more likely to have particular genetic profiles, suggests an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.

Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children
Children and youth of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk of diabetes themselves, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Two diabetes medications don't slow progression of type 2 diabetes in youth
In youth with impaired glucose tolerance or recent-onset type 2 diabetes, neither initial treatment with long-acting insulin followed by the drug metformin, nor metformin alone preserved the body's ability to make insulin, according to results published online June 25 in Diabetes Care.

People with diabetes visit the dentist less frequently despite link between diabetes, oral health
Adults with diabetes are less likely to visit the dentist than people with prediabetes or without diabetes, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine.

Read More: Diabetes News and Diabetes Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.