Micro and Nano Scale Characterization of Fibers

May 14, 2008

Fibres present massive challenges and opportunities for micro and nano technologies. These challenges are not in the manufacturing of the fibres but in the control and understanding of their behaviour.

This one-day workshop will focus on the many challenges of fibre analysis at the micro and nano-scale using state-of-the art surface chemical analysis, including SIMS, XPS and SPM techniques.

Topics include fundamental effects of topography in SIMS and XPS, AFM nanomechanics, frictional force microscopy,multivariate analysis and important applications in industry.

This workshop will bring together leading researchers and practical analysts from industry and academia for discussions on the latest developments. Recommendations and guidance for reliable and robust measurements will be presented. The workshop is being held in conjunction with UK Surface Analysis Forum(www.uksaf.org), which will be held at the same venue on the preceding day (Wednesday 2nd July).

Confirmed speakers and topics include: Steve's talk is scheduled for late afternoon on Wednesday 2 July

A conference dinner will be held on the evening of the 2nd July.
-end-


National Physical Laboratory

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