May 22-23 workshop on impacts of severe space weather events

May 14, 2008

The nation's current and future ability to cope with severe space weather events and their possible societal and economic impacts is the focus of a free public workshop organized by the National Research Council's Space Studies Board. Panel session topics include: space weather impacts in retrospect, collateral impacts, current infrastructure, user perspectives on space weather products, and extreme events in space weather.

DETAILS:

The workshop will be held Thursday, May 22, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Friday, May 23, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Washington Plaza Hotel, 10 Thomas Circle, N.W., Washington, D.C. More information and a draft agenda is available at http://www7.nationalacademies.org/ssb/spaceweatherwkshp_may08.html.
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REPORTERS WHO WISH TO ATTEND MUST REGISTER IN ADVANCE with the Office of News and Public Information, tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail news@nas.edu.

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

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