Jonathan Porritt at UK Groundwater Forum

May 14, 2009

Jonathan Porritt will be a key speaker at the 10th Annual UK Groundwater Forum Conference at the Natural History Museum, London on 14th May 2009. The theme of the meeting is 'Groundwater: A 2020 Vision - Challenges for the Future'.

Since it was launched in 1995, the UK Groundwater Forum has run a series of one-day conferences on topical issues relevant to the management of groundwater resources, enabling water companies, regulators and researchers to debate the supply of clean water resources for future generations. 2009 is the tenth anniversary of these conferences and to mark this occasion a number of eminent speakers have been invited to explore the major challenges for groundwater management in the future.

The Forum is delighted to announce the involvement of Jonathon Porritt, Programme Director of Forum for the Future and Chair of the UK Sustainable Development Commission to set the sustainable development context for the presentations that follow.

The groundwater management challenges will be presented from the perspective of major players, including the environmental regulators, the water industry and private users. Specific issues including ground heat management and emerging pollutants will also be addressed, and the degree to which research is addressing the needs of managers of the environment and water supplies will be explored.

Denis Peach, UK Groundwater Forum, said "These are challenging times for the water sector particularly with the uncertainty caused by climate change. The most vulnerable parts of the country are the areas most reliant on groundwater. The awareness amongst the public of this underground resource is generally poor - the aim of the UK Groundwater Forum over the last 15 years has been to raise awareness. The Forum also brings together professionals to discuss the issues and this is what will be happening at the Natural History Museum on the 14th May. How can we best manage our groundwater resources over the coming 10 years?".
-end-
For further details or to arrange media interviews please contact:

David Macdonald
UK Groundwater Forum Secretariat
Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, OX10 8BB
email: contact@groundwateruk.org
Tel. +44 (0)1491 692 306

Clive Mitchell
BGS Press Office, Keyworth, Nottingham
email: cjmi@bgs.ac.uk
Tel. + 44 (0)115 936 3257

Notes for Editors

The British Geological Survey

The British Geological Survey (BGS), a component body of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), is the nation's principal supplier of objective, impartial and up-to-date geological expertise and information for decision making for governmental, commercial and individual users. The BGS maintains and develops the nation's understanding of its geology to improve policy making, enhance national wealth and reduce risk. It also collaborates with the national and international scientific community in carrying out research in strategic areas, including energy and natural resources, our vulnerability to environmental change and hazards, and our general knowledge of the Earth system. More about the BGS can be found at www.bgs.ac.uk.

UK Groundwater Forum

Formed in 1995, the UK Groundwater Forum is an independent organisation which aims to raise awareness of groundwater and the role it plays in water supplies and the environment. The Forum obtains funding from a number of external sources including research organisations, regulators and water companies. The Forum undertakes a wide range of activities including provision of educational material, careers information and groundwater articles, all of which are available on the website at www.groundwateruk.org.

British Geological Survey

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