Expert consensus on catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias

May 14, 2009

Boston 14th May 2009: A call to action for more research to be undertaken into catheter ablation in the field of ventricular arrhythmia (VA) has been issued in a joint consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the US Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). The consensus document - launched at Heart Rhythm 2009, the Heart Rhythm Society's 30th Annual Scientific Sessions, to be held 13 to 16 May in Boston - provides an up to date review of indications, techniques and outcomes of catheter ablation for treatment of ventricular arrhythmias, a technique now being offered to increasing numbers of patients.

"In the last few years there has been a substantial evolution of techniques for catheter ablation in VA. We hope this document will help identify the areas in catheter ablation that require further research, and encourage clinicians to embark on more clinical and registry studies," says Etienne Aliot, the European co-chair from Nancy, France. "It is only by conducting more clinical trials and registries that we can begin to get an idea of exactly how catheter ablation fits into the whole VA treatment paradigm including Implantable Cardio Defibrillators (ICDs) and antiarrhythmic drugs."

The document - authored by 20 leading European and US electrophysiologists - recognises there is still "very limited" data establishing the long term impact of catheter ablation on morbidity and mortality.

Unanswered questions highlighted by the joint document include:"Over the past decade there has been great progress with important advances in methods for mapping and ablating ventricular arrhythmias, but there are also many gaps in our knowledge where more work is needed. EHRA and HRS recognized that a document summarizing where we are now, where there is agreement and where we need to go would be timely and important," says William Stevenson, the US co-chair from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA - USA.

The document is the third joint consensus document to be issued by EHRA and HRS at the Heart Rhythm meeting, with EHRA taking the lead this year.

"Having one document between Europe and the US is vitally important since it gives both clinicians and patients the confidence that they are doing the right thing. Having different documents on both sides of the Atlantic is a recipe for confusion," says Professor Aliot.

In an area with few clinical trials, but many single centre reports, the consensus document summarised the opinion of task force members based on their own experience of treating patients, in addition to a review of the literature. For each topic, two members of the task force drafted a discussion document that was then considered and edited by all members of the team.

The document examines indications, outcomes, and contraindications of catheter ablation, which are important concerns for physicians and their patients with ventricular arrhythmias that require treatment. In addition, specific technical aspects of ablation procedures important for electrophysiologists are discussed including methods for mapping to identify ablation targets, roles for newer technologies, the use of anticoagulation, analgesia and anesthesia, and antiarrythmic drug management. The knowledge base that physicians need, and the support staff and equipment required, are also considered.

There are two major types of ventricular arrhythmias. Those associated with heart disease are often due to abnormal electrical circuits originating from diseased areas of scar in the ventricular myocardium. A prior heart attack is a common cause. The second type concerns those where there is no structural disease, known as idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias.

Ventricular arrhythmias may cause symptoms such as syncope and palpitations, and in the most severe cases, cause cardiac arrest and sudden death. Many patients with ventricular arrhythmias and structural heart disease have implantable defibrillators that terminate VA when they occur, but these episodes may still cause symptoms and in some cases require painful shocks for termination. Catheter ablation has an important role in preventing or reducing recurrent attacks of symptomatic VA in these situations and can be life-saving for patients with incessant arrhythmias.

Most idiopathic VA are benign, but careful evaluation is required to distinguish idiopathic from potentially dangerous VA. Ablation is an important alternative to antiarrhythmic drug therapy in many patients with idiopathic VA.

Catheter ablation, the procedure used to selectively eliminate the cells responsible for the arrhythmia, involves inserting catheters (thin flexible wires) into blood vessels, usually in the groin, and threading them through the blood vessels into the heart ventricle under X-ray guidance.

The next step is for the electrophysiologist to use the catheter to identify the source of the abnormal electrical activity in a procedure known as mapping. Mapping may involve triggering VA, or identifying abnormal areas that contain the substrate for VA based on findings during sinus rhythm. Radiofrequency energy is then applied through the catheter to destroy the abnormal area. Finally, testing is performed to determine if ablation has been sufficient to prevent the VA. The process of "mapping and ablation" continues until the electrical disturbance can no longer be triggered by catheters or no further substrate can be identified.

Recent innovations in catheter ablation include:
-end-
Contact:
Ann-Marie White: +1 (202) 725-7997 (HRS)
Jacqueline Partarrieu: +334 9294 8627 (ESC)

Notes

Task Force Members: E. Aliot (Co-Chair), W.G. Stevenson (Co-Chair), J. Almendral Garrote (Spain) , F. Bogun (US) , H. Calkins (US), E. Delacretaz (Switzerland) , P. Della Bella (Italy), G. Hindricks (Germany), P. Jaïs (France), M. Josephson (US), J. Kautzner (Czech Republic), G.N. Kay (US) , K.H. Kuck (Germany), B. Lerman (US) , F. Marchlinski (US), V. Reddy (US), M.J. Schalij (Netherlands), R. Schilling (UK), K. Soejima (US), D. Wilber (US).

Little exists in the way of statistics on the prevalence of VT. One study undertaking 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiograms of 915 men and 1,874 women in a long term care facility found that the prevalence of VT was 16% in men and 15% in women with Coronary Artery Disease, 9 % in men and 8% in women with hypertension, valvular disease, or cardiomyopathy without CAD, and 3% in men and 2% in women with no cardiovascular disease.

Wilbert S. Aronow et al. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 57:M178-M180 (2002)

About the Heart Rhythm Society:

The Heart Rhythm Society is the international leader in science, education and advocacy for cardiac arrhythmia professionals and patients, and the primary information resource on heart rhythm disorders. Its mission is to improve the care of patients by promoting research, education and optimal health care policies and standards. Incorporated in 1979 and based in Washington, DC, it has a membership of more than 4,800 heart rhythm professionals in more than 65 countries around the world. www.HRSonline.org

About EHRA:

EHRA, the European Heart Rhythm Association, aims to serve as the leading organisation in the field of arrhythmias and electrophysiology in Europe, and to attract physicians from all of Europe and beyond to foster the development of this area of expertise. EHRA is a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). EHRA is based in Sophia- Antipolis, France. Visit us at www.escardio.org/EHRA

European Society of Cardiology

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