Yes, the grass IS greener: Why Canadian nurses go -- and stay -- in the US

May 14, 2009

(Toronto: May 14, 2009) A study looking at Canadian-educated registered nurses working in the USA found that opportunities for ongoing education, including formal support for graduate education and ease of licensure, in addition to full-time employment, were key factors that contribute to the migration of Canadian nurses to the USA, particularly baccalaureate-educated nurses.

Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing's Dr. Linda McGillis Hall, Associate Dean, Research, is the lead author of the study, published online today in the International Nursing Review.

"These findings are important for Canadian health services policy-makers to consider, as they develop strategies to retain nurses in Canada," says Hall. "The emigration of Canadian RNs to the USA worsens existing shortages in Canada, and creates shortages where none might have existed if these RNs had remained."

The study also found that: These findings suggest a serious depletion of nursing human capital is on the horizon, as degree-educated nurses emigrate to the United States, says Hall.

The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of Canadian-educated registered nurses working in the USA, why nurses leave Canada, remain outside of Canada, or under what circumstances might return to Canada. Data for this study include the 1996, 2000 and 2004 USA National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses and reports from the same time period from the Canadian Institute for Health Information.
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The International Nursing Review is published by the Geneva-based International Council of Nurses, a federation of national nurses' associations, representing nurses in more than 128 countries.

View the study here: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122383969/abstract

The Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, is one of the world's premier nursing schools in education and research, and celebrates its 90th anniversary in 2010. Our clinicians, researchers, educators and students are part of the answers to the questions shaping the future of health care in Canada.

Celebrate Nursing Week, May 11 to May 17, 2009!

For further information, contact:

Linda McGillis Hall, RN, PhD
Associate Dean, Research
Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, U of T
1-416-978-2869
l.mcgillishall@utoronto.ca

Lucianna Ciccocioppo
Communications & Media Relations
Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, U of T
1-416-946-3657
Lucianna.ciccocioppo@utoronto.ca

University of Toronto

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