Nav: Home

Protect protruding teeth from damage and long-term consequences

May 14, 2019

Children with their first or early adult set of teeth that stick out have an increased chance of damaging them, but the risk can be easily reduced without being prohibitively costly.

A study undertaken at the University of Adelaide of more than 50,000 children aged under 19 years published in the journal Dental Traumatology, confirms a direct link between the degree to which a young patient's teeth protrude and the chance of damaging them.

"Traumatic dental injuries have been identified as the fifth most prevalent disease or injury globally and their subsequent management is costly," says Dr Esma Dogramaci, Senior Lecturer in Orthodontics, the University of Adelaide.

"While the number of traumatic dental injuries have fallen over recent decades, they have significant physical, psychological and economic consequences.

"Young children up to the age of six years with teeth that stick out more than 3mm have over three times higher chance of trauma than children without protruding teeth.

Children over six years with teeth that protrude more than 5mm have over double the chance of trauma," says Dr Dogramaci.

Corrective orthodontic treatment of children's teeth isn't usually undertaken until all permanent adult teeth have come through - usually after the age of 12 years. However, an expensive visit to an orthodontist isn't essential to protect teeth that stick out.

"A dentist can easily measure how far a child's teeth stick out and recommend whether they should be fitted with a brace. They can apply simple braces which can reduce the prominence of protruding teeth and significantly reduce the chance of them being damaged," says Dr Dogramaci.

If children suck their thumb this may also cause the teeth to stick out so they should be discouraged from this habit as early as possible. Children should also wear a mouth guard to protect protruding teeth when playing sports.

"Early identification and protection of protruding teeth through regular dental check-ups reduces the chance of early problems becoming long-term dental issues," says Dr Dogramaci.

"If young teeth are broken or knocked out long-term issues may occur like the need for root canal treatment or even tooth loss, requiring a lifetime commitment for general dental treatment.

"Also, if orthodontic treatment is carried out on teeth that have previously suffered from trauma, further complications can occur during orthodontics that could lead to the loss of those teeth.

"The results of this study confirm that regular check-ups, particularly for children, are a must for good long-term dental health."
-end-
The research was carried out by the Adelaide Dental School, the University of Adelaide.

University of Adelaide

Related Trauma Articles:

Ultrasound for children with abdominal trauma
Despite evidence showing that the routine use of sonography in hospital emergency departments can safely improve care for adults when evaluating for possible abdominal trauma injuries, researchers at UC Davis Medical Center could not identify any significant improvements in care for pediatric trauma patients.
Assessing and addressing the impact of childhood trauma
People experiencing psychosis become more prone to experiencing unusual thoughts, beliefs, and experiences that make it harder to distinguish reality.
Meet your new electronic trauma intervention
The popular building-block computer game Tetris might be more than an idle pastime that keeps you glued to a screen.
Pitt to lead trauma network, up to $90M in Department of Defense-funded trauma research
The University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences has been awarded a US Department of Defense contract that could lead to $90 million in research over the next decade to improve trauma care for both civilians and military personnel.
Changing the consequences of national trauma
New research led by social psychologist Bernhard Leidner at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will look at the consequences of violent trauma for groups and nations and investigate what victims and perpetrators can learn from it to avoid future trauma and conflict.
Trauma and shopping
Traumatic events have lasting influence on what products people desire and purchase.
Trauma patient deaths peak at 2 weeks
New research shows patients could be more likely to die two to three weeks after lower severity trauma.
More doesn't mean better when it comes to trauma centers
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have demonstrated for the first time that changes over time in the volume of patients seen by trauma centers influence the likelihood of seriously injured patients living or dying.
Trauma research funding needed now more than ever, say experts
Funding for trauma research is needed now more than ever, and should become a priority in the wake of so many lives lost at mass casualty events -- including most recently at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, say experts in an opinion piece published in the online journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open.
Not only trauma but also the reversal of trauma is inherited
Behaviors caused by traumatic experiences in early life are reversible.

Related Trauma Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".