Nav: Home

Study: Superbug MRSA infections less costly, but still deadly

May 15, 2018

DALLAS - May 15, 2018 - Staph infections, whether MRSA (resistant to methicillin) or susceptible, are important and deadly. Drug-resistant staph infections continue to be deadlier than those that are not resistant and treatable with traditional antibiotics, but treatment costs surprisingly are the same or slightly less, a new national analysis shows.

Studies show that about one in three people carry staph in their nose, usually without any illness, and about two in 100 people carry MRSA, one of the so-called superbug infections that are resistant to traditional antibiotics such as methicillin and penicillin, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

"The lower costs for treating drug-resistant infections were a surprise," said Dr. Trish Perl, Chief of Infectious Diseases at UT Southwestern Medical Center and a co-author of the study conducted with collaborators at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) and Johns Hopkins University. "The findings are contrary to previous predictions and studies that suggested the treatment costs for drug-resistant infections would be greater."

Looking across four years of data, researchers found:

Treatment costs for drug-resistant staph infections (MRSA-related pneumonia) were about $38,500 compared with more than $40,700 for pneumonias (MSSA-related pneumonias) in 2014.

Treatments costs for non-pneumonia-related hospitalizations related to staph infections were $15,578 for MSSA-related infections compared with $14,792 for MRSA-related infections. Similar patterns were observed from 2010 to 2013.

Cost differences between MSSA- and MRSA-related pneumonia hospitalizations rose from 25.8 percent in 2010 to 31 percent in 2014.

There are not data showing the total number of people who get MRSA skin infections in the community, according to the CDC, but recent studies revealed that invasive (life-threatening) MRSA infections in health care settings are declining. Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been associated with worse patient outcomes and higher costs of care than susceptible (MSSA) infections. However, the healthcare landscape has changed since prior studies found these differences, including widespread dissemination of community-associated strains of MRSA, according to the study.

"This is a large study and importantly shows a change in the epidemiology of staph infections," said Dr. Perl, Professor of Internal Medicine who holds the holds the Jay P. Sanford Professorship in Infectious Diseases.

Reasons for the lower costs may be due to price differences in drugs used to treat the different types of infections or that MSSA infections treated in the data were more severe or that less-invasive MSSA infections may not be diagnosed or coded correctly, leaving only costlier MSSA infections in the record. Alternatively, this difference may relate to the fact that care providers failed to change from antibiotics used for MRSA to more appropriate antibiotics in a timely fashion, the authors said.

Quantifying the difference in costs and outcomes between patients infected with resistant and susceptible organisms are important for prioritizing investments in antimicrobial drugs,

diagnostics, and clinical operations, the researchers said. Further studies are needed to identify risk factors that predispose people to resistant infections. Adjusting for differences in underlying patient severity may help ameliorate these issues and provide a better understanding of the economic impact of antibiotic resistance, the researchers concluded.
-end-
The research appears in the journal, Clinical Infectious Diseases. The researchers conducted a retrospective analysis using data from the National Inpatient Sample obtained from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for the years 2010 to 2014. This work was supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More about MRSA

Terms to know:

MRSA: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

MSSA: methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

Who is most likely to get an MRSA infection?

In the hospital, people who are more likely to get an MRSA infection are people who:
    Have other health conditions making them sick

    Have been in the hospital or a nursing home

    Have been treated with antibiotics

    People who are healthy and who have not been in the hospital or a nursing home can also get MRSA infections, which typically involve the skin.

How do you get an MRSA infection?

People who have MRSA germs on their skin or who are infected with MRSA may be able to spread the germ to other people. MRSA can be passed on to bed linens, bed rails, bathroom fixtures, and medical equipment. It can spread to other people on contaminated equipment and on the hands of doctors, nurses, other health care providers, and visitors.

What can I do to help prevent MRSA infections?

In the hospital, make sure that all doctors, nurses, and other health care providers clean their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub before and after caring for you.

When you go home, if you have wounds or an intravascular device (such as a catheter or dialysis port), make sure that you know how to take care of it.

For more information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Source: CDC



About UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution's faculty has received six Nobel Prizes, and includes 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 16 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. The faculty of more than 2,700 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and is committed to translating science-driven research quickly to new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in about 80 specialties to more than 100,000 hospitalized patients, 600,000 emergency room cases, and oversee approximately 2.2 million outpatient visits a year.

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Related Antibiotics Articles:

Resistance can spread even without the use of antibiotics
Antibiotic resistance does not spread only where and when antibiotics are used in large quantities, ETH researchers conclude from laboratory experiments.
Selective antibiotics following nature's example
Chemists from Konstanz develop selective agents to combat infectious diseases -- based on the structures of natural products
Antibiotics can inhibit skin lymphoma
New research from the LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center at the University of Copenhagen shows, surprisingly, that antibiotics inhibit cancer in the skin in patients with rare type of lymphoma.
Antibiotics may treat endometriosis
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that treating mice with an antibiotic reduces the size of lesions caused by endometriosis.
How antibiotics help spread resistance
Bacteria can become insensitive to antibiotics by picking up resistance genes from the environment.
More Antibiotics News and Antibiotics Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...