Ex-Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Australia's Cape York Peninsula

May 15, 2019

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Queensland's Cape York Peninsula. Despite the storm weakening below tropical cyclone status, warnings remain active for strong winds and flooding potential.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM issued a Strong Wind Warning for the North East Gulf of Carpentaria for today, May 15, and tomorrow, May 16. There is also a Flood Watch in effect for coastal catchments between Cooktown and Port Douglas.

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Ann has the potential to generate areas of heavy rainfall. ABM noted "Catchments remain wet following coastal showers and rain areas during the last few days, which will make stream rises and flooding more likely with the onset of heavy rainfall. Enhanced rainfall is expected to occur on the coastal catchments north of Port Douglas and through to Cooktown during Wednesday." Heavy rainfall may also lead to flash flooding and the catchments likely to be affected include the Endeavour River and the Daintree River.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the remnant clouds on May 15 and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument provided a visible image of the storm. The VIIRS image showed the center of the low pressure area in the middle of the northern Cape York Peninsula, framed by the Heartlands Resources Reserve to the north, the Iron Range National Park to the east, and the Mungkan Kandju National Park south of the circulation center.

The remnants of Ann are expected to move west into the Gulf of Carpentaria in the next day.

For updated forecasts, visit the ABM website: http://www.bom.gov.au
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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