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Obesity medicine association announces major updates to its adult obesity algorithm

May 15, 2019

DENVER -- May 15, 2019 -- The Obesity Medicine Association (OMA) announced the immediate availability of the 2019 OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm, with new information for clinicians including the relationship between Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Dyslipidemia, and Cancer; information on investigational Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy; treatments for Lipodystrophy; and Pharmacokinetics and Obesity.

"Obesity is much more than an increase in body fat," said Dr. Harold Bays, MD, FTOS, FACC, FACE, FNLA, FOMA, an OMA Board of Trustee member, the Medical Director of L-MARC Research Center in Louisville, Kentucky and the co-chair of the Adult Obesity Algorithm. "Obesity is a disease that both directly and indirectly contributes to heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, abnormal fats in the blood, fatty liver and even cancer. The 2019 OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm helps clinicians combat this expansive disease that affects more than 70 percent of the population by providing a comprehensive roadmap for treatment and evaluation."

The OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm is a resource for health care professionals looking for evidence-based and clinical guidance for managing the chronic disease of Obesity. Contents of the OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm include:
  • Causes and health consequences of Obesity
  • Assessment and evaluation of Obesity
  • Nutritional treatment strategies
  • Physical activity treatment strategies
  • Behavioural treatment strategies
  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Treating common metabolic and chronic diseases
  • Assessment, evaluation and management of bariatric surgery
The OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm was originally released in 2013 and undergoes a rigorous review each year by a committee representing a diverse range of clinicians, allied health professionals, clinical researchers and academicians, intended to reflect a multidisciplinary and balanced group of experts in obesity science, evaluation and treatment. All contents in the OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm are based upon scientific evidence, supported by medical literature and derived from clinical experiences.

"Obesity is a disease that is complex and is not easily treated by simply adjusting a person's lifestyle choices. The OMA works tirelessly to provide high quality educational programs, tools and other resources to supply health care providers with powerful information to help improve patient care," says Claudia Randall, MBA, and Executive Director of the Obesity Medicine Association.

"The science and clinical management of obesity is rapidly evolving," said Dr. William McCarthy, MD, founder of the Continuing Medical Education program at Potomac Hospital in Woodbridge, Virginia and co-chair of the OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm. "To keep up, we really need at least yearly updates. That is what we have done."
-end-
The 2019 OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm is available in print, in a keyword friendly searchable e-book format and in a presentation PowerPoint format. To learn more, visit http://www.obesitymedicine.org/obesity-algorithm.

About the Obesity Medicine Association

The Obesity Medicine Association (OMA) is the largest organization of physicians and other healthcare providers dedicated to the clinical treatment of the disease of Obesity. OMA members are clinical experts in Obesity Medicine who use a comprehensive, scientific and individualized approach when treating Obesity, which helps patients achieve improved health and weight goals. Learn more at http://www.obesitymedicine.org.

Obesity Medicine Association

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