Nav: Home

Increasing Threat Of Extinction For Amphibians? Scientists To Seek Answers At NSF Workshop

May 15, 1998

Where have all the frogs, toads and salamanders gone? The world's leading researchers on amphibian declines will debate that question, and seek explanations for continuing downward trends of some amphibian populations, at a workshop sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Loss of wetland habitat has reduced populations of frogs and toads, and endangered several species of amphibians with restricted ranges, scientists say. Alarming new events have added to this long-term trend, these researchers believe. Frog and toad populations have declined dramatically in the past several years, many in high-altitude locations in the western United States, and in Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia and Australia. Studies suggest that the declines may be caused by infections, perhaps promoted by environmental stressors such as synthetic organic compounds like pesticides, metallic contaminants, acid precipitation, UV-B radiation and increased temperatures.

These issues and some of the latest research on amphibians will be the subject of the NSF workshop. Experts from leading institutions in this field of biology will attempt to answer the question of whether there's any hope of rescuing the frogs, toads and salamanders of the world before it's too late.

What: Workshop on Amphibian Population Declines

Where: National Science Foundation (Exhibit Center, First Floor)
4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Virginia (Ballston Metro Stop) For more information contact (media only): Cheryl Dybas, (703) 306-1070, cdybas@nsf.gov.

Note to television editors: Amphibian b-roll is available upon request. Call Dena Headlee at 1-888-937-5249.
-end-


National Science Foundation

Related Amphibians Articles:

How does a frog heal wounded skin without scarring?
When a Xenopus frog is deeply wounded, its skin can regenerate without scarring.
A virus lethal to amphibians is spreading across Portugal
A new strain of ranavirus is currently causing mass mortality in several species of amphibian in the Serra da Estrela, the highest mountain range in continental Portugal.
Twenty-five frogs added to the amphibian fauna of Mount Oku, Cameroon
While amphibians all over the world are undergoing a continuous decline, their status in certain regions, such as Central Africa, remains unknown due to incomplete information.
New research explores the effect of winter dormancy on cold-blooded cognition
Unlike mammals, amphibians who rest up during the winter do not forget the memories they made beforehand -- this is the surprising discovery of new scientific research.
Poisonous amphibian defenses are linked to higher extinction risk
Research published by a Swansea University scientist has found amphibians which have a toxic defense against predators -- such as the iconic poison dart frogs -- have a much higher risk of extinction than species which use other types of defense mechanisms.
More Amphibians News and Amphibians Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...