Nav: Home

Physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive care at end of life

May 16, 2016

New research suggests that US physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive or critical care units in the last months of life than non-physicians. Hospitalization rates were similar.

The retrospective study analyzed fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries across the United States using Medicare Part A claims data from 2008 to 2010 for 9947 decedent physicians and a random sample of 192,006 Medicare decedents.

"Our findings seem to run exactly counter to the prevailing message that doctors die different and better -- it turns out doctors are human too," said Dr. Daniel Matlock, lead author of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society article. "Also, we think this raises concerns that the high utilization seen at the end-of-life is a larger, systems issue."
-end-


Wiley

Related Hospice Articles:

Why fewer blood cancer patients receive hospice care
Research has shown that patients with blood cancers are less likely to enroll in hospice care than patients with solid cancers, and the findings from a national survey suggest that concerns about the adequacy of hospice may prevent blood cancer specialists from referring their patients.
Study compares hospice care in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and patient homes
A new study from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute has found only minimal differences in the intensity of hospice services provided in nursing homes as compared to hospice services provided to patients in assisted living facilities or their homes.
Hospice caregivers should be screened early to prevent depression, anxiety
A study at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that nearly one-quarter of caregivers were moderately or severely depressed and nearly one-third had moderate or severe anxiety.
The heavier the person, the lower the chance of getting hospice care or dying at home
The heavier someone is, the less likely they are to have what many people might call a 'good death,' with hospice care and a chance to die at home, a new study finds.
Primary care physician involvement at end of life associated with less costly, less intensive care
A new study published in the January/February issue of Annals of Family Medicine finds that primary care physician involvement at the end of life is associated with less costly and less intensive end-of-life care.
Mor earns GSA's 2016 Robert W. Kleemeier Award
The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Vincent Mor, Ph.D., of Brown University as the 2016 recipient of the Robert W.
Asking patients where they want to die when admitted to hospice linked to fewer hospitalizations
Patients who were asked where they wanted to die upon entering hospice had lower rates of hospitalization at the end of life, as did those in hospices that monitored symptoms more frequently, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
Palliative, hospice care lacking among dying cancer patients, Stanford researcher finds
Medical societies, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, recommend that patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care soon after diagnosis and receive hospice care for at least the last three days of their life.
Doctors don't die differently than anyone else, CU Anschutz researchers say
A new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus appears to disprove the increasingly popular notion that doctors die differently than everyone else, using fewer interventions that often have little value.
Physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive care at end of life
New research suggests that US physicians are more likely to use hospice and intensive or critical care units in the last months of life than non-physicians.

Related Hospice Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...