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Traditional Chinese medicine is widely used for cardiovascular disease

May 16, 2018

In this Letter to the Editor, the authors comment on a review article by Hao et al. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cardiovascular Disease: Evidence and Potential Mechanisms, J Am Coll Cardiol 2017;69(24):2952-66 which assesses the efficacy and safety of TCM for cardiovascular disease, as well as the pharmacological effects of active TCM ingredients on the cardiovascular system and potential mechanisms.

The authors provide a brief summary addressing nonpharmacotherapy in TCM, including acupuncture, moxibustion, Qigong, and Tai Chi. They also discuss traditional antiarrhythmic drug-related randomized controlled trials to make the coverage more comprehensive, before noting that they support the concept that research into, development of, and application of active ingredients is part of modern TCM.
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Traditional Chinese Medicine Is Widely Used for Cardiovascular Disease

Yanwei Xing, MD, PhD1, Hector Barajas-Martinez, PhD2 and Dan Hu, MD, PhD3,4
1Guang' Anmen Hospital, Chinese Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China
2Global Genetics Corporation, Ventura, CA 93003, USA
3Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China
4Hubei Key Laboratory of Cardiology, Wuhan 430060, China
DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0054

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