Nav: Home

New research could improve efficiency and luminance of TV and smartphone displays

May 16, 2018

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. - Your TV and smartphone could be more efficient and luminescent thanks to new research conducted with assistance from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

When it comes time to buy something like a new TV, the casual consumer will be focused on the size of the screen, while more tech-savvy consumers are interested in knowing things like if the display is LCD or OLED. Put simply, these display technologies determine the quality of the picture on the screen for not just TVs but also for smartphones, computers and tablets. While the market is currently dominated by LCD, both OLED and LCD use what are called thin-film transistors (TFTs).

"While the research provides a way to improve the quality of displays and lower cost, it can also improve the production of electronic devices like solar cells," said Tara Dhakal, director of Binghamton University's Center for Autonomous Solar Power (CASP).

These TFTs are typically produced using one of three processes: amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), low-temperature polysilicon (LTPS) or Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide (IGZO). But a paper titled "High mobility crystalline silicon film growth below 600 °C from an Au-Si eutectic melt for TFTs,"published in Materials Letters, suggests an opportunity to replace these processes, including the most popular process, LTPS, entirely.
-end-
The technology was invented by the late Praveen Chaudhari, materials physicist and recipient of the U.S. National Medal of Technology. Ashok Chaudhari, CEO of Solar-Tectic LLC, and Ratnakar D. Vispute of Blue Wave Semiconductors, Inc. oversaw and made the samples, exactly following P. Chaudhari's recipe (now patented), which were then tested by CASP.

Dhakal worked on the study as part of a partnership between businesses and Binghamton University called the Strategic Partnership for Industrial Resurgence (SPIR). His graduate student Pravakar P. Rajbhandari was involved in the characterization of the silicon film provided by Solar-Tectic LLC.

Binghamton University

Related Smartphone Articles:

Object identification and interaction with a smartphone knock
A KAIST team has featured a new technology, 'Knocker', which identifies objects and executes actions just by knocking on it with the smartphone.
Smartphone typing speeds catching up with keyboards
The largest experiment to date on mobile typing sheds new light on average performance of touchscreen typing and factors impacting the text input speed.
Which comes first: Smartphone dependency or depression?
New research suggests a person's reliance on his or her smartphone predicts greater loneliness and depressive symptoms, as opposed to the other way around.
Unlock your smartphone with earbuds
A University at Buffalo-led research team is developing EarEcho, a biometric tool that uses modified wireless earbuds to authenticate smartphone users via the unique geometry of their ear canal.
Are there health consequences associated with not using a smartphone?
Many studies have examined the health effects of smartphone abuse, but a new study looks at the sociodemographic features and health indicators of people who have a smartphone but do not use it regularly.
More Smartphone News and Smartphone Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...