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Exploring today's research on tomorrow's battery

May 17, 2016

RICHLAND, Wash. -- About 250 of the world's leading energy storage experts will gather at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory next week to discuss the latest battery technologies that are making electric transportation and large-scale renewable energy storage more accessible.

At the Ninth Energy Storage Symposium: Beyond Lithium Ion, leaders from national labs, industry and academia will share their research into developing next-generation energy storage technologies that can be less costly, safer and more environmentally friendly than today's state-of-the-art energy storage device, the lithium-ion battery.

When the conference was first organized in 2009, its sole focus was developing better energy storage for electric vehicles. But this year's symposium will also include discussion on large-scale stationary batteries to support the power grid, as the grid's complexity has grown exponentially with the increasingly widespread use of intermittent wind and solar power.

This year's conference includes a keynote address from Patricia Hoffman, assistant secretary for DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, which funds the research, development and demonstration of a wide range of grid-related energy storage technologies. PNNL speakers include Wei Wang, who will discuss materials and chemistries for redox flow batteries, and Yuyan Shao, who will discuss the chemistry of magnesium and zinc batteries.

The annual symposium is co-organized by five Department of Energy national laboratories, NASA and IBM. This is the second time PNNL has hosted the event; it was also held here in 2011.

More information is available at the conference website. The full agenda is also online at http://events.pnnl.gov/default.aspx?topic=BLI_IX:_Agenda. In addition to formal talks, about 50 researchers will present their work in a scientific poster session on the afternoon of Wednesday, May 25, 2016.

Special tours will also be offered of the following locations on the afternoon of Thursday, May 26:

Reporters interested in attending may do so free of charge, but must register in advance by contacting Franny White at franny.white@pnnl.gov or 509-375-6904.

What: Ninth Symposium on Energy storage: Beyond Lithium Ion

When: Tuesday, May 24 - Thursday, May 26, 2016

Where: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

How: Researchers can register online; reporters should contact Franny White at franny.white@pnnl.gov or 509-375-6904
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Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science. Founded in 1965, PNNL employs 4,400 staff and has an annual budget of nearly $1 billion. It is managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. As the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, the Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information on PNNL, visit the PNNL News Center, or follow PNNL on Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn and Twitter.

DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

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