Wearable bionics on display in Dublin

May 18, 2015

A bionic bra, sweat-analysis watch and a movement-monitoring knee sleeve will be part of a display this week at a showcase of Irish-Australian research collaboration.

The wearable devices will be featured at the Australian Embassy, Ireland, and are being developed through a partnership between Dublin City University and Australian researchers, all part of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES).

The collaboration has been a long and fruitful one, going back over 20 years, combining DCU strengths in sensing technologies and invaluable links to industry, with Australian materials development and fabrication expertise including state-of-the-art 3D printing technologies.

The results of the partnership are functional devices that address real needs. The sweat-analysis watch (or, sweatch, as it is called in the lab), constantly analyses the user's sweat to detect and monitor hydration status and health indicators.

The bionic bra has received worldwide attention for its ability to sense breast movement and respond by autonomously 'tightening' at various points.

Also on display will be the ACES BioPen, a handheld device designed to allow orthopaedic surgeons to '3D print' bio-materials directly into a patient in surgery.

All devices have been enabled by advances in 3D printing technology, which will also be featured in live demonstrations as part of an event to be held Thursday May 21, hosted by Ambassador Ruth Adler, a great supporter of the partnership.

"It is a pleasure to showcase the result of this collaboration and to see groups of like-minded researchers sharing ideas and working towards a common goal," she said. "The future possibilities for these technologies seem to be limited only by the imagination."

Media Opportunity

Event: Emerging 3D Printed Bio-Compatible Technologies
Thursday 21 May 2015, 4.30-6.30pm
Australian Embassy 7th floor, Fitzwilton House, Wilton Terrace, Dublin 2
-end-


ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science

Related Collaboration Articles from Brightsurf:

Collaboration sparks new model for ceramic conductivity
As insulators, metal oxides - also known as ceramics - may not seem like obvious candidates for electrical conductivity.

Trustful collaboration critical for outcome of therapy
A trusting therapeutic relationship and outcome-oriented collaboration between therapist and patient are critical for the successful treatment of mental illness.

Collaboration is key to rebuilding coral reefs
The most successful and cost-effective ways to restore coral reefs have been identified by an international group of scientists, after analyzing restoration projects in Latin America.

Classification-coordination-collaboration
Fu et al. outlined a systems approach, Classification-Coordination-Collaboration (3C), to advance Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Collaboration lets researchers 'read' proteins for new properties
A collaboration between the McKelvey School of Engineering and St.

Collaboration yields insights into mosquito reproduction
As carriers for diseases like dengue and Zika, mosquitoes kill more than 1 million people each year and sicken hundreds of millions more.

Achieving optimal collaboration when goals conflict
New research suggests that, when two people must work together on a physical task despite conflicting goals, the amount of information available about each other's actions influences how quickly and optimally they learn to collaborate.

Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration
In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible.

Dynamic collaboration behind new research into best way of using biologging tags
Methods used to design F1 cars and spacecraft have played a crucial role in new research into the tags used to track animal movements.

Imaging collaboration sheds new light on cancer growth
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have uncovered new insights into how the normal controls on cell growth are lost in cancer cells, leading to rapid tumour expansion.

Read More: Collaboration News and Collaboration Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.