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Higher survival rate for overweight colorectal cancer patients than normal-weight patients

May 19, 2016

OAKLAND, Calif., May 19, 2016 -- Overweight colorectal cancer patients were 55 percent less likely to die from their cancer than normal-weight patients who have the disease, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published today in JAMA Oncology.

Of cancers affecting both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Research has shown that people with higher body mass indexes (BMI) are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with several types of cancer; however, once diagnosed their prognosis is often better than normal-weight patients. This has been called the "obesity paradox."

"Overweight and obesity have been identified as risk factors for many health conditions, but for people with colorectal cancer, some extra weight may provide protection against mortality," said lead author Candyce H. Kroenke, ScD, research scientist with the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, California. "Our study, which represents the largest cohort of colorectal cancer patients with the most comprehensive data regarding patient weight before, at time of, and following diagnosis, supports the notion of the 'obesity paradox.'"

In this study, researchers examined the electronic medical records of 3,408 men and women diagnosed with stages 1 through 3 colorectal cancer between 2006 and 2011. All were Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California.

Patients were compared for mortality risk based on their BMI at the time of diagnosis and 15 months following diagnosis. The data were adjusted for socioeconomic and demographic factors, disease severity, pre-diagnosis BMI, smoking, and other factors. Compared with patients who were low-normal-weight at diagnosis (BMI between 18.5 and less than 23), those who were underweight (BMI under 18.5) or obese (BMI greater than or equal to 35) had elevated risks of mortality.

By contrast, patients who were in the high-overweight category at diagnosis (BMI between 28 and up to 30) had a 48 percent lower risk of mortality overall and a 55 percent lower risk of mortality related to colorectal cancer when compared with patients in the low-normal-weight category.

Senior author Bette J. Caan, DrPH, research scientist with the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, said that biological mechanisms for the obesity paradox are not known, and merit additional study.

"The current findings, and previous and ongoing research on the obesity paradox, suggest that recommendations for the ideal weight range associated with the best outcomes after a cancer diagnosis may not be the same as the ideal weight range to prevent cancer," Caan said. "And just as treatment differs by cancer, ideal weight recommendations may vary according to cancer site."
-end-
This study was funded by the National Cancer Institute (5R01CA175011).

About the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research

The Kaiser Permanente Division of Research conducts, publishes, and disseminates epidemiologic and health services research to improve the health and medical care of Kaiser Permanente members and society at large. It seeks to understand the determinants of illness and well-being, and to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of health care. Currently, DOR's 500-plus staff is working on more than 400 epidemiological and health services research projects. For more information, visit http://www.dor.kaiser.org or follow us @KPDOR.

About Kaiser Permanente

Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America's leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 10.6 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: kp.org/share

Kaiser Permanente

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