Nav: Home

Canadian cardiologist publishes world first mitral regurgitation procedure

May 19, 2017

TORONTO, May 19, 2017-- A Canadian cardiologist has published a report in the journal Eurointervention describing how he used a Canadian-invented device for the first time in the world to successfully insert a MitraClip® through a patient's jugular vein rather than the femoral vein.

When Dr. Neil Fam examined his 86-year-old patient with severe mitral regurgitation--a condition in which the blood flows backward into the heart after it contracts--his options for treating her were limited.

Because of her age and overall health, Ortensia Aceti of Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., was not a good candidate for surgery to repair her mitral valve, the flap between the two left chambers of her heart. She had been in and out of hospital with heart failure and medication was no longer controlling her symptoms.

Instead, he decided on a catheter-based treatment to guide a MitraClip device to the heart and clamp the leaky valve. The catheter would usually be inserted through the femoral vein in the leg, but her vein was blocked.

"We were locked out, blocked from accessing her heart," said Dr. Fam, an interventional cardiologist and director of the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit of St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.

Dr. Fam recalled a conversation he had about a year previously with Baylis Medical Company, Inc., a Canadian supplier of high-tech cardiology equipment, about one of their devices that was designed to achieve access to the heart from alternative approaches.

For the first time in the world, Dr. Fam successfully used the company's SupraCross RF Solution to guide a MitraClip device through the jugular vein - a more direct route to the heart -- and successfully repair Mrs. Aceti's leaking mitral valve.

Dr. Fam said this was possible, despite the awkward angle of the jugular vein in relation to the heart, because the tip of the sheath is steerable and the wire is equipped to deliver radiofrequency energy to puncture the septum of the heart. This allows the physician to position the system appropriately from this challenging angle and puncture the septum of the heart in a precise and controlled manner without using excessive force. The septum is the dividing wall between the left and right sides of the heart and it's the last barrier to getting to the mitral valve, which sits between the left ventricle and the left atrium.

Dr. Fam said Mrs. Aceti had no complications and her condition improved, allowing her to be discharged to her home. At a followup appointment, she was doing well with no further heart failure.

Sue Carlucci, one of Mrs. Aceti's three daughters, said that Dr. Fam explained the novel procedure to the family carefully in advance.

"If Dr. Fam hadn't suggested this procedure, we probably would have lost our mom," she said.

"He's our angel," she said, referring to St. Michael's nickname, the Urban Angel.

Dr. Fam said that while this procedure would be appropriate for only selected patients, they are high-risk patients for which there may be no other treatment options.

"Given the success of this procedure, the door is open for future studies of the jugular approach for treating the mitral valve," he said.

Dr. Fam published a report of this procedure in Eurointervention on May 9.
-end-
About St. Michael's Hospital

St. Michael's Hospital provides compassionate care to all who enter its doors. The hospital also provides outstanding medical education to future health care professionals in more than 29 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, care of the homeless and global health are among the hospital's recognized areas of expertise. Through the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Center, which make up the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, research and education at St. Michael's Hospital are recognized and make an impact around the world. Founded in 1892, the hospital is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto.

For more information, or to interview Dr. Fam please contact:

Leslie Shepherd
Manager, Media Strategy
Phone: 1-416-864-6094
ShepherdL@smh.ca
St. Michael's Hospital
Inspired Care. Inspiring Science.

To speak to someone from Baylis, please contact:

Laura Mills
Marketing Manager
Baylis Medical Company
Tel: 905.602.4875 ext. 292
lmills@baylismedical.com
http://www.baylismedical.com

St. Michael's Hospital

Related Mitral Valve Articles:

Innovative valve train saves 20% fuel
Empa has developed an innovative, electrohydraulically actuated valve train for internal combustion engines, that enables completely free adjustment of stroke and timing, while at the same time being robust and cost effective.
Cyborg-like microchip valve driven by earthworm muscle
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have developed the first microchip valve powered by living cells.
Defects in heart valve cilia during fetal development cause mitral valve prolapse
Genetic mutations in heart valve cells of the developing fetus lead to mitral valve prolapse, report a global collaborative of researchers, including Medical University of South Carolina investigators, in today's Science Translational Medicine.
Echocardiograms may help with patient selection for transcatheter mitral valve repair
Clinicians should use echocardiography, an ultrasound that shows the heart's structure and function, when determining whether patients with heart failure and a leaking heart valve are likely to benefit from valve repair, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Transcatheter valve replacement safe in those with unusual valve anatomy
Compared with patients who had a typical tricuspid aortic valve, patients with a more unusual bicuspid aortic valve had a similar rate of death but a higher likelihood of stroke after undergoing a procedure to replace the valve by threading surgical equipment through an artery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
World's largest study shows treatment success in minimally invasive mitral valve surgery
Scientists at the Center for Cardiology of the Mainz University Medical Center have examined the success of more than 13,575 minimally invasive procedures on the mitral valve in the largest study of their kind to date.
Prosthetic valve mismatches common in transcatheter valve replacement, ups risk of death
In the largest multi-institutional study to date, led by researchers from Penn Medicine, the team found that among patients who underwent a transcatheter aortic valve replacement, a high number experienced severe and moderate cases of prosthesis-patient mismatch.
Heart failure patients with mitral regurgitation benefit from minimally invasive procedure
A multicenter clinical trial has found that a minimally invasive procedure called transcatheter mitral valve repair significantly reduced hospitalizations and mortality for heart failure patients with moderate-to-severe or severe functional mitral regurgitation.
Latest Structural Heart issue features research on TAVR and Mitral VIV and VIR procedures
The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team features original research articles on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and the safety and efficacy of percutaneous mitral valve-in-valve and valve-in ring procedures.
Percutaneously reducing secondary mitral regurgitation in heart failure appears futile
Munich, Germany -- Aug. 27, 2018: Percutaneously reducing secondary mitral regurgitation appears futile when tested in all heart failure patients, according to late breaking research presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018 and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
More Mitral Valve News and Mitral Valve Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.