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Bacterial pneumonia predicts ongoing lung problems in infants with acute respiratory FAI

May 19, 2019

ATS 2019, Dallas, TX -- Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure, according to research presented at ATS 2019. The researchers found that infants with bacterial pneumonia when they left the hospital were more likely to have lung problems that required supplemental oxygen, bronchodilators or steroids.
-end-
VIEW ABSTRACT

CONTACT FOR MEDIA

Garrett Keim, MD
keimg@email.chop.edu

Session: A27 Pediatric Lung Infection and Critical Care Around the World
Abstract Presentation Time: Sunday, May 19, 9:15 a.m. CT
Location: Trinity Ballroom 1-3 (Level 3), Omni Dallas Downtown

American Thoracic Society

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