Neuroscience and Psychiatry: NIMH Sponsors

May 20, 2001

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is sponsoring a symposium with scientific presentations in honor of Richard Jed Wyatt, M.D., a researcher at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for 32 years and currently chief of the Neuropsychiatry Branch at NIMH The event will be held Wednesday, May 30, 2001, from 9-12am and 1:30-5pm, at Natcher Auditorium on the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland,. The event is open to the public.

Distinguished speakers will speak on topics of interest to Dr. Wyatt, throughout his career. Morning speakers include:

The afternoon will be comprised of short talks by scientists who served as fellows in Wyatt's laboratory over the years. They include: Daniel Weinberger, M.D., chief, NIMH Clinical Brain disorders Branch (CBDB); Joel Kleinman, M.D., NIMH CBDB; Karen Berman, NIMH CBDB; Lynn DeLisi, M.D., State University of New York, Stony Brook; Steve Potkin, M.D., University of California, Irvine; William Freed, Ph.D., NIDA; Jack Grebb, M.D., Janssen Research Foundation; and Daniel Luchins, M.D., University of Chicago.

"Richard Wyatt's lab has been the pioneer in translational research in psychiatry at the NIMH," noted Weinberger. "It provided a model for interactions between basic and clinical scientists focused around a common program goal: to understand the biology of schizophrenia. His lab has produced a generation of international leaders in schizophrenia research."

Wyatt has served in the NIMH Intramural Research Program since l969, studying schizophrenia, mood disorders, drug abuse, Alzheimer's disease and the biology of sleep. Research teams under his direction have pioneered experimental models of brain grafts for Parkinson's disease, and shown that early intervention can alter the course of schizophrenia.

This and other work have produced about 800 scientific publications and 6 books. Wyatt also co-produced (with his wife, Kay Jamison, Ph.D.) a series of programs about manic depressive illness and creativity that aired on public television. In his cover story in the Washington Post Health section, Feb 13, 2001, Wyatt related some of this experiences battling cancer for the third time. | NIMH Home | Welcome | News and Events | Clinical Trials | Funding Opportunities | | For the Public | For Practitioners | For Researchers | Intramural Research | | Top |
-end-
For information about NIMH and its programs, please email, write or phone us.

NIMH Public Inquiries
6001 Executive Boulevard, Rm. 8184, MSC 9663
Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 USA
Voice 301-443-4513; Fax 301-443-4279
This page was last updated: May 21, 2001.

NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Related Schizophrenia Articles from Brightsurf:

Schizophrenia: When the thalamus misleads the ear
Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Synapsy National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) have succeeded in linking the onset of auditory hallucinations - one of the most common symptoms of schizophrenia - with the abnormal development of certain substructures of a region deep in the brain called the thalamus.

Unlocking schizophrenia
New research, led by Prof. LIU Bing and Prof. JIANG Tianzi from the Institute of Automation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators have recently developed a novel imaging marker that may help in the personalized medicine of psychiatric disorders.

Researchers discover second type of schizophrenia
In a study of more than 300 patients from three continents, over one third had brains that looked similar to healthy people.

New clues into the genetic origins of schizophrenia
The first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, appears in the Jan.

Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia
A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a UCL researcher.

Schizophrenia: Adolescence is the game-changer
Schizophrenia may be related to the deletion syndrome. However, not everyone who has the syndrome necessarily develops psychotic symptoms.

Study suggests overdiagnosis of schizophrenia
In a small study of patients referred to the Johns Hopkins Early Psychosis Intervention Clinic (EPIC), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that about half the people referred to the clinic with a schizophrenia diagnosis didn't actually have schizophrenia.

The ways of wisdom in schizophrenia
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that persons with schizophrenia scored lower on a wisdom assessment than non-psychiatric comparison participants, but that there was considerable variability in levels of wisdom, and those with higher scores displayed fewer psychotic symptoms.

Recognizing the uniqueness of different individuals with schizophrenia
Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia differ greatly from one another. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, along with colleagues from England and Norway, have demonstrated that very few identical brain differences are shared amongst different patients.

Resynchronizing neurons to erase schizophrenia
Today, a decisive step in understanding schizophrenia has been taken.

Read More: Schizophrenia News and Schizophrenia Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.