Nav: Home

Treadmill with care - UU researchers warn

May 20, 2004

Unaccustomed strenuous aerobic exercise can be bad for you, according to UU research.

The news that couch potatoes have been longing to hear comes from a research project conducted by Dr Gareth Davison and Dr Ciara Hughes of the School of Applied Medical Sciences and Sports Studies at the University of Ulster's Jordanstown campus.

The scientists have found that unaccustomed exhaustive aerobic exercise - which involves taking the heart rate to approximately 85% of its maximum for more than 10 minutes - releases dangerous free radicals that can adversely affect normal biological function in unfit individuals.

The only people who should push their bodies to this level of exercise on a regular basis are trained athletes, as these individuals seem to be protected from any adverse effects, according to Dr Davison. Unfit or individuals who exercise sporadically can cause serious chemical damage to their bodies.

"Our results highlight that you must 'eat healthy' at all times and ensure you have a proper intake of vitamins if you are involved in high-intensity exercise," said researcher Dr Ciara Hughes.

"If you are into high intensity exercise, you should work your way up to it and not simply just plunge in."

The research team used two groups of volunteers, giving one group a mixture of antioxidants, and the other a placebo. After a week of taking the tablets, the groups were put through their paces on a treadmill and went through routine medical tests.

Blood analysis revealed that the exhaustive aerobic exercise caused damage to important DNA and lipid molecules.

"Cellular damage was induced by the exercise. But we found that the group who were on the antioxidants had been protected to some extent," said Dr Davison.

"Natural antioxidants can be found in a balanced diet consisting of foods such as broccoli, spinach and berries. A key lesson is: if you are involved in strenuous aerobic exercise, make sure your diet is rich in antioxidants -- because they will protect against damaging your health.

But Dr Davison warns that the team's work should not be used as an excuse to take no exercise at all. There is a wealth of evidence that shows that exercise of a moderate intensity is protective against many chronic diseases.

The researchers will submit their work to a top scientific journal in the summer.
-end-


University of Ulster

Related Work Articles:

Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress
Workers with greater boundary control over their work and personal lives were better at creating a stress buffer to prevent them from falling into a negative rumination trap, says a new study co-written by a trio of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign experts who study occupational stress and employee well-being.
Can't concentrate at work? This AI system knows why
Computer scientists have developed a way to measure staff comfort and concentration in flexible working spaces using artificial intelligence.
There's a better way to think about being kept waiting at work
Generally, abstract thinking leads to better outcomes, such as more creativity, wider vision and feeling more powerful.
Making light work
A collaboration between McMaster and Harvard researchers has generated a new platform in which light beams communicate with one another through solid matter, establishing the foundation to explore a new form of computing.
Does flexible work 'work' for Aussie parents?
An Australian study examining the relationship between flexibility and parent health has revealed formal family-friendly workplace provisions alone are not meeting the demands of working mothers and fathers.
Do open relationships really work?
Open relationships typically describe couples in which the partners have agreed on sexual activity with someone other than their primary romantic partner, while maintaining the couple bond.
Ebola antibodies at work
Scientists in Israel and Germany show, on the molecular level, how an experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against the disease.
Work that kills
More than 64% of employed Russians work evenings, nights or weekends, and this is one of the highest figures among European countries.
Reattaching to work is just as important as detaching from work, study finds
Employees who mentally reattach to work in the morning are more engaged at work, according to a new study.
Be yourself at work -- It's healthier and more productive
At work, it's healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study from Rice University, Texas A&M University, the University of Memphis, Xavier University, Portland State University and the University of California, Berkeley.
More Work News and Work Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.