Nav: Home

A new indicator for esophageal varix in alcoholic disease

May 20, 2008

Variceal hemorrhaging is associated with a high mortality rate. The early detection of esophageal varices is critical for the effective prevention of variceal hemorrhage.

In daily medical practice, it is common to encounter patients with liver damage from chronic alcohol consumption. When the alcoholic patient is examined, it is often evident that alcoholic liver damage is progressing. Once alcoholic cirrhosis is established, esophageal varices develop in the majority of patients, as found during prolonged follow-up. Nevertheless, alcoholic patients tend to be indifferent regarding their health, and are not likely to undergo periodic consultations. The research team therefore examined the predictive factors for esophageal varices in severe alcoholic disease.

An article to be published on April 7, 2008 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology describes the predictive factors. A study was reported by Dr. Satoshi Mamori, of Jikei University, in which he analyzed the background of alcoholic patients to predict the occurrence of esophageal varices.

Abdominal ultrasonography (US) was performed on 444 patients suffering from alcoholism. The alcoholic patients with splenomegaly and/or withering of the right lobe of the liver were defined as severe alcoholic disease patients (SAD) and participated as the study subjects. The SAD patients were observed by upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy to evaluate the development of esophageal varies. The existence of esophageal varices was then compared according to a number of clinical background variables.

44 patients were identified as SAD patients. Twenty-five patients (56.8%) had esophageal varices, and a univariate analysis revealed a significant difference in the age and type IV collagen levels between the patients with and without esophageal varices. Moreover, a logistic regression analysis identified only one independent variable predictive of esophageal varices: type IV collagen (P = 0.017). The area under the curve of type IV collagen, as determined by the receiver operating characteristic for predicting expressed esophageal varices, was 0.78.

The combination of abdominal ultrasound scan and type IV collagen correctly identified, at a high rate, the patients with esophageal varices.
-end-
Reference: Mamori S, Searashi Y, Matsushima M, Hashimoto K, Uetake S, Matsudaira H, Ito S, Nakajima H, Tajiri H. Serum type IV collagen is a predictive factor of esophageal varices in patients with severe alcoholic disease. World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(13): 2044-2048 http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/14/2044.asp

Correspondence to: Satoshi Mamori, MD, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, the Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishi-shinbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8461, Japan. mamori@jikei.ac.jp Telephone: +81-3-34331111-3201 Fax: +81-3-3435-0569

About World Journal of Gastroenterology

World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG), a leading international journal in gastroenterology and hepatology, has established a reputation for publishing first class research on esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, liver cancer, viral hepatitis, colorectal cancer, and H pylori infection. It provides a forum for both clinicians and scientists. WJG has been indexed and abstracted in Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch) and Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition, Index Medicus, MEDLINE and PubMed, Chemical Abstracts, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Abstracts Journals, Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology and Hepatology, CAB Abstracts and Global Health ISI JCR 2003-2000 IF: 3.318, 2.532, 1.445 and 0.993. WJG is a weekly journal published by WJG Press. The publication dates are the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th of every month. The WJG is supported by The National Natural Science Foundation of China, No. 30224801 and No. 30424812, and was founded with the title China National Journal of New Gastroenterology on October 1, 1995, and renamed WJG on January 25, 1998.

About The WJG Press

The WJG Press mainly publishes World Journal of Gastroenterology.

World Journal of Gastroenterology

Related Liver Articles:

A new treatment for liver cancer
In the latest issue of Molecular Therapy, Skoltech and MIT researchers have published a new combinatorial therapy for the treatment of liver cancer.
Longevity protein SIRT6 also protects against fatty liver and fatty liver disease
SIRT6 regulates fat metabolism by activating another protein called peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha).
Immune cell identity crisis: What makes a liver macrophage a liver macrophage?
UC San Diego researchers investigated how a type of immune cell called a macrophage becomes specialized to the liver.
Liver transplants could be redundant with discovery of new liver cell
Researchers at King's College London have used single cell RNA sequencing to identify a type of cell that may be able to regenerate liver tissue, treating liver failure without the need for transplants.
How viable is your liver after you die?
In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers from Harvard Medical School have done a study on the viability of donated livers and its correlation with donor demographics.
Blocking platelets: A possible option to prevent fatty liver disease and liver cancer
Blood platelets which interact with liver cells and immune cells play a major role in the development of fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver inflammation and liver cancer, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg and from Zurich University and University Hospital have now shown in a publication.
Micro-control of liver metabolism
A new discovery has shed light on small RNAs called microRNAs in the liver that regulate fat and glucose metabolism.
Liver transplants double for alcohol-related liver disease
The proportion of US liver transplants for alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) has doubled in the last 15 years, in part due to broader acceptance of waiving the mandated period of sobriety before transplants for this population, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco, which showed ongoing regional geographic variations in liver transplant rates for ALD patients, whose long-term survival rate is slightly lower than other liver transplant patients.
Liver transplant for alcohol-related liver disease in US
The proportion of liver transplants in the United States for alcohol-associated liver disease increased between 2002 and 2016, with much of the increase associated with a decrease in liver transplant for hepatitis C virus infection because of antiviral therapy.
Real-time detection of cholesterol in liver-on-chip cultures of human liver cells
In a paper to be published in the September/December 2019 issue of TECHNOLOGY, a team of researchers from the IIT, Chicago, has developed a novel microfluidic device for measuring in real-time the cholesterol secreted from liver tissue-chip containing human hepatocytes.
More Liver News and Liver Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.