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Cardiac MRI may lead to targeted PAH therapy

May 20, 2019

ATS 2019, Dallas, TX -- Patients at greatest risk of dying from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be identified through cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the information the noninvasive scan provides about the functional level of the heart's right ventricle, according to research presented at ATS 2019. Researchers said stratification of mortality risk in PAH can help doctors provide targeted therapies to those at greatest risk and measure their effectiveness by monitoring right ventricular function.
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VIEW ABSTRACT

Session: B27 Heartbreaker: Heart Failure and Pulmonary Hypertension
Abstract Presentation Time: Monday, May 20, 9:15 a.m. CT
Location: Room C141/C143/C149 (Level 1), Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas

American Thoracic Society

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