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Enzyme may represent new target for treating asthma

May 20, 2019

ATS 2019, Dallas, TX -- An enzyme called diacylglycerol kinase zeta (DGKζ) appears to play an important role in suppressing runaway inflammation in asthma and may represent a novel therapeutic target, according to research presented at ATS 2019. The researchers deleted the enzyme in mouse T cells, which drive the immune system, and found that both inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness, two hallmarks of asthma, were reduced through independent biomolecular mechanisms.
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VIEW ABSTRACT

Session: B29 Mechanisms for Airway Hyperresponsiveness: From Cell to Organism
Abstract Presentation Time: Monday, May 20, 9:15 a.m. CT
Location: Ballroom D Four (Level 3), Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas

American Thoracic Society

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