Nav: Home

Baylor Scott & White gastroenterology researchers share key takeaways from DDW 2019

May 20, 2019

Researchers from Baylor Scott & White Research Institute's Center for Esophageal Research will play key roles at this year's Digestive Disease Week. Baylor Scott & White is known for the unique multidisciplinary team approach applied to bench and clinical research, as well as the clinical care provided at the largest not-for-profit healthcare system in Texas.

The following researchers are available to discuss how this unique program model is making an impact in the field of gastroenterology, including their ground-breaking research on Barrett's Esophagus and Eosinophilic Esophagitis. They will also be available to weigh in on key topics and trends coming out of Digestive Disease Week 2019.
  • Rhonda Souza, MD, AGAF - Co-Director, Center for Esophageal Research and Chair, AGA Institute Council

  • Stuart J. Spechler, MD, AGAF, FACG - Co-Director, Center for Esophageal Research and 2019 Esophageal, Gastric & Duodenal Disorders Research Mentor Award Recipient

  • Vani Konda, MD - Clinical Director, Center for Esophageal Diseases
Baylor Scott & White is committed to diagnosing and treating digestive disease conditions and working across the continuum of care to provide rehabilitation and other lifestyle adjustments to patients.

Through advanced diagnostic technology, education and support programs, and research and clinical trials conducted through Baylor Scott & White Research Institute, Baylor Scott & White offers a unique and comprehensive program for a variety of digestive diseases. The Center for Esophageal Research is devoted to conducting innovative, translational research in a multidisciplinary setting in order to advance understanding of esophageal diseases and to improve the treatment of patients with those diseases.
-end-


Baylor Scott & White Research Institute

Related Gastroenterology Articles:

Digestive symptoms are prominent among COVID-19 patients reveals study in The American Journal of Gastroenterology
The American Journal of Gastroenterology published today a new study that reveals digestive symptoms, including diarrhea, are common in COVID-19 patients.
Baylor Scott & White gastroenterology researchers share key takeaways from DDW 2019
Dr. Stuart J. Spechler among researchers from Baylor Scott & White Research Institute available to provide key takeaways from Digestive Disease Week 2019.
The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology: Colorectal cancer incidence on the rise among young adults in several high-income countries
The incidence of colon and rectal cancer in adults younger than 50 years has increased substantially over the latest available 10-year period in several high-income countries, going against a decline or stabilisation trend in the incidence of colorectal cancers within the overall populations of high-income countries.
The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology and The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: Whole body MRI may help to detect spread of cancers more quickly
Trials with people with newly-diagnosed colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer suggest that whole body MRI could reduce the time it takes to diagnose the stage of cancers.
The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology: Hypnotherapy could help relieve irritable bowel syndrome symptoms
Peer-reviewed / Randomised Controlled Trial / People Gut-directed hypnotherapy delivered by psychologists appears as effective in group or individual sessions, potentially offering a new treatment option for irritable bowel syndrome in primary and secondary care
Low FODMAP diet and IBS recently published by Dove Medical Press
The evidence to date indicates that restriction of FODMAPs is an effective dietary intervention for reducing IBS symptoms.
Gastroenterology Special Issue confirms: You are what you eat
The editors of Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, are pleased to announce the publication of this year's highly anticipated special 13th issue on food, the immune system and the gastrointestinal tract.
Bariatric surgery can benefit some obese children and teens, reports Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Bariatric surgery -- as a last resort when conservative interventions have failed -- can improve liver disease and other obesity-related health problems in severely obese children and adolescents, according to a position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.
What's the current role of liver biopsy in children? Position paper in Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
While noninvasive alternatives are increasingly available, liver biopsy still provides essential information in some children with liver disease, according to a new position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.
AGA introduces new journal: Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology
The American Gastroenterological Association is pleased to welcome a new member to its family of journals: Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
More Gastroenterology News and Gastroenterology Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 3: Shared Immunity
More than a million people have caught Covid-19, and tens of thousands have died. But thousands more have survived and recovered. A week or so ago (aka, what feels like ten years in corona time) producer Molly Webster learned that many of those survivors possess a kind of superpower: antibodies trained to fight the virus. Not only that, they might be able to pass this power on to the people who are sick with corona, and still in the fight. Today we have the story of an experimental treatment that's popping up all over the country: convalescent plasma transfusion, a century-old procedure that some say may become one of our best weapons against this devastating, new disease.   If you have recovered from Covid-19 and want to donate plasma, national and local donation registries are gearing up to collect blood.  To sign up with the American Red Cross, a national organization that works in local communities, head here.  To find out more about the The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project, which we spoke about in our episode, including information on clinical trials or plasma donation projects in your community, go here.  And if you are in the greater New York City area, and want to donate convalescent plasma, head over to the New York Blood Center to sign up. Or, register with specific NYC hospitals here.   If you are sick with Covid-19, and are interested in participating in a clinical trial, or are looking for a plasma donor match, check in with your local hospital, university, or blood center for more; you can also find more information on trials at The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project. And lastly, Tatiana Prowell's tweet that tipped us off is here. This episode was reported by Molly Webster and produced by Pat Walters. Special thanks to Drs. Evan Bloch and Tim Byun, as well as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.