Russian scientists make discovery that can help remove gypsy moths from forests

May 20, 2019

The caterpillars of Lymantria dispar or Gypsy Moth are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests. Sometimes they can even make harm for coniferous forests. Gypsy Moths are widely spread in Europe, Asia and Northern America.

There are several ways to control the population of these critters. However, the main problem is that the insect sprays, which are ordinarily used to get rid of Gypsy Moths, influence differently on male and female caterpillars.

Recently, researchers from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Tomsk State University and Novosibirsk State University have developed a quick and effective method for the identification of the Gypsy Moth caterpillars' sex, which was challenging enough. Co-authors of the study are Irina Belousova, Nikita Ershov, Sergey Pavlushin, Yury Ilinsky and Vyacheslav Martemyanov.

The results of the research have been published in the Journal of Insect Physiology.

Yury Ilinsky, a researcher from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, claims that their discovery can help the scientists create new ways to control the population of Gypsy Moths. There will be more forests, which means more fresh air.
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Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University

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Russian scientists make discovery that can help remove gypsy moths from forests
The caterpillars of Lymantria dispar or Gypsy Moth are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests.

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