IIASA launches book series in adaptive dynamics

May 21, 2000

The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) announces initiation of a new book series in collaboration with Cambridge University Press.

The Cambridge Studies in Adaptive Dynamics series, edited by IIASA's Adaptive Dynamics Network (ADN) project, is the first to extend evolutionary game theory in a way that allows for analyzing the adaptive implications of complex ecological settings. Designed to aid graduate students and researchers in biology, ecology, and genetics, the series enhances understanding of adaptive phenomena through a mathematical and statistical approach that incorporates empirical observations and theoretical insights. The wide application of adaptive processes also makes the series valuable to physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists.

Cambridge University Press initiated the series in May 2000 with publication of The Geometry of Ecological Interactions: Simplifying Spatial Complexity, edited by Ulf Dieckmann, Richard Law, and Johan A.J. Metz. Ulf Dieckmann is Project Coordinator of the ADN at IIASA. Richard Law is Reader in Biology at the University of York. Johan A.J. Metz is Professor of Mathematical Biology at the Institute of Evolutionary and Ecological Sciences at Leiden University, and project leader of the ADN at IIASA.

Forthcoming titles in the series include:

Elements of Adaptive Dynamics, edited by Ulf Dieckmann and Johan A.J. Metz.

The Adaptive Dynamics of Infectious Diseases: In Pursuit of Virulence Management, edited by Ulf Dieckmann, Johan A.J. Metz, Maurice Sabelis, and Karl Sigmund.

The Geometry of Ecological Interactions: Simplifying Spatial Complexity (ISBN 0521 64294 9) is available from Cambridge University Press, priced £45.00/$74.95. To order a copy, or for information on forthcoming books in the series, visit http://www.cup.cam.ac.uk (UK) or http://www.cup.org (USA) or email hproctor@cup.cam.ac.uk.

For more information on the Adaptive Dynamics Network, visit the ADN web site at http://www.iiasa.ac.at/Research/ADN. For more information about this book series, go to http://www.iiasa.ac.at/Research/ADN/Books.html.

IIASA is an independent, non-governmental, interdisciplinary research institution, specializing in natural and social scientific research methods and models valued by policy makers, the scientific community and the public worldwide. IIASA is an international institution with sponsoring organizations in 15 countries. For more information about IIASA, visit the web site at http://www.iiasa.ac.at.
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International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

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