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New study describes standardized assessment for students graduating from UK medical schools

May 21, 2017

A new study describes a standardised assessment that ensures that students who graduate from UK medical schools have achieved a minimum standard of knowledge and skill related to prescribing medications. Following the introduction of the Prescribing Safety Assessment, as described in a new article published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, the vast majority of final-year medical students are able to accurately prescribe medications, but a small proportion require further training or supervision before being able to prescribe independently.

Prescription medicines are one of the most frequent interventions used by doctors to alleviate symptoms, treat illnesses, and prevent future disease. Because newly-graduated doctors write a large proportion of prescriptions in hospitals, it is important to assess their competence at prescribing medications before graduation. This is a complex skill to assess, however, due to the large number of prescribing scenarios that might be tested, the variety of documentation used, and the challenge of marking large numbers of prescriptions in a standardised way.

Simon Maxwell, MD, PhD of the University of Edinburgh and his colleagues from the British Pharmacological Society and Medical Schools Council sought to tackle these issues by creating a national assessment that would identify graduates who need more training and supervision in prescribing, and in the future might also highlight which training methods are most successful in developing competent practitioners.

Over a period of 5 years, the investigators developed the Prescribing Safety Assessment as a 2-hour online assessment of competence. With the development of an online delivery system and a unique approach to automated online marking of large numbers of prescriptions, the team was able to overcome the practical difficulties of assessing prescribing.

"Our paper demonstrates the feasibility of delivering a standard national prescribing assessment involving around 200 assessment events at academic centres around the UK each year and enabling tens of thousands of prescriptions to be instantaneously assessed against a standardised marking scheme," said Prof. Maxwell.

For the study, 7343 final-year medical students in 31 UK medical schools took the Prescribing Safety Assessment. The overall pass rate was 95 percent with the pass rates for the individual papers ranging from 93 to 97 percent. The Prescribing Safety Assessment was re-taken by 261 students who had failed, and 80 percent of those candidates passed. There was significant variation in performance between students from different medical schools.

"We believe that this is the first example of a large-scale nationally applied assessment of prescribing competence anywhere in the world," said Prof. Maxwell. "We have now participation by medical schools in Ireland and Malta, with growing interest about building on this assessment from educators in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and India. Also, in the UK, we are exploring whether the Prescribing Safety Assessment and its associated training modules might have utility as an assessment for more senior doctors and pharmacists."
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Additional Information

Full Citation: "Prescribing Safety Assessment 2016: Delivery of a national prescribing assessment to 7,343 UK final-year medical students." Simon R.J. Maxwell, Jamie J. Coleman, Lynne Bollington, Celia Taylor, and David J Webb. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. Published Online: May 22, 2017, DOI: 10.1111/bcp.13319.

Link to study: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bcp.13319

Author Contact: To arrange an interview with the author, please contact the University of Edinburgh's press office at press.office@ed.ac.uk or +44 (0)131 650 9547.

About the Journal

The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology has the primary goal of publishing high quality research papers on all aspects of drug action in humans. The journal has a wide readership, bridging the medical profession, clinical research and the pharmaceutical industry, and is published monthly. It is owned by the British Pharmacological Society and published by Wiley. The journal's current Impact Factor is 3.83 (Thomson Reuters Science Citation Index).

About The British Pharmacological Society

The British Pharmacological Society is a charity with a mission to promote and advance the whole spectrum of pharmacology. Founded in 1931, it is now a global community at the heart of pharmacology, with over 3,500 members from more than 60 countries worldwide. The Society leads the way in the research and application of pharmacology around the world through its scientific meetings, educational resources and peer-reviewed journals: the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Pharmacology Research & Perspectives, and the British Journal of Pharmacology, which includes the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY, featuring open access overviews of the key properties of over 1,700 human therapeutic targets and their drugs, and links to http://www.guidetopharmacology.org.

Press Office: T. +44 (0) 207 239 0184| M. +44 (0) 7557 400327| E. Katharine.Steer@bps.ac.uk

About Wiley

Wiley, a global company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com

Wiley

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