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African-Americans with COPD appear less likely to use pulmonary rehab

May 21, 2019

ATS 2019, Dallas, TX -- African American patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, are less likely to participate in pulmonary rehabilitation programs than white patients, even when there are programs nearby, according to research presented at ATS 2019. The researchers said this disparity is concerning because pulmonary rehabilitation has been shown to increase life expectancy, reduce exacerbations from the disease and improve quality of life.
-end-
Session: C17 Pulmonary Rehabilitation 2019
Presentation Time: Tuesday, May 21, 10 a.m. CT
Location: Room C146 (Level 1), Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas

VIEW ABSTRACT

CONTACT FOR MEDIA

Kerry Spitzer, PhD, MPA
Kerry.spitzer@baystatehealth.org

American Thoracic Society

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