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Hospital-acquired infections may be lower in closed ICUs

May 22, 2019

ATS 2019, Dallas, TX -- Three hospital-acquired infections rates appear to be lower in patients admitted to a "closed" intensive care unit, meaning that the ICU team has primary responsibility for the patient, rather than a primary care physician, according to research presented at ATS 2019. Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) and ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) were lower after a medical center transitioned from an open to a closed ICU, while methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile (C. Diff) rates remained the same.
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CONTACT FOR MEDIA

Ahmad Sharayah, MD
drsharayah@gmail.com

Session: D44 Critical Care: An Encounter - How We Manage Critical Care In and Out of the ICU
Abstract Presentation Time: Wednesday, May 22, 11:15 a.m. CT
Location: Area E (Hall F, Level 2), Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas

American Thoracic Society

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