Nav: Home

When developing vaccines against COVID-19, 'fast is slow, and slow is fast'

May 22, 2020

Bypassing clinical trials for a potential SARS-CoV-2 vaccine would be "catastrophic," says Science Advances deputy editor Douglas Green in this Editorial. Instead, it's vital to take time to ensure any vaccine candidate's safety and investigate potential adverse effects, he says. A vaccine able to trigger strong neutralizing antibody responses in clinical tests will still not be ready for widespread implementation without comprehensive safety tests. For example, vaccines must be examined for causing an effect known as antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), whereby vaccine-induced antibodies that bind to the virus also attach to the body's cells, facilitating infection of these cells - a concerning phenomenon that has been observed in vaccines against dengue, Ebola, HIV, and feline coronavirus. Ethical accelerated testing on humans should not be ruled out completely, but extreme risks must be weighed against potential benefits, Green says. There are currently 95 vaccines in development against SARS-CoV-2, with most expected to clear Phase I and two experimental vaccines already moving into Phase II trials.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Vaccines Articles:

Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
EPFL scientists have developed a new computational approach to create artificial proteins, which showed promising results in vivo as functional vaccines.
Misinformation on vaccines readily available online
Parents researching childhood vaccinations online are likely to encounter significant levels of negative information, researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington, have found.
Battle with the cancer: New avenues from childhood vaccines
A new research from the University of Helsinki showed for the first time how the pre-immunization acquired through common childhood vaccines can be used to enhance therapeutic cancer treatment.
Personalized cancer vaccines
The only therapeutic cancer vaccine available on the market has so far showed very limited efficacy in clinical trials.
Doubts raised about effectiveness of HPV vaccines
A new analysis of the clinical trials of HPV vaccines to prevent cervical cancer raises doubts about the vaccines' effectiveness.
Egg-based flu vaccines: Not all they're cracked up to be?
Flu season is underway in the Northern Hemisphere, sickening millions of people and in rare cases, causing hospitalization or death.
You're probably not allergic to vaccines
Five facts about allergies to vaccines, pulled together by two McMaster University physicians.
Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot.
Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease
The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study.
Bioengineers imagine the future of vaccines and immunotherapy
In the not-too-distant future, nanoparticles delivered to a cancer patient's immune cells might teach the cells to destroy tumors.
More Vaccines News and Vaccines Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Clint Smith
The killing of George Floyd by a police officer has sparked massive protests nationwide. This hour, writer and scholar Clint Smith reflects on this moment, through conversation, letters, and poetry.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Nina
Producer Tracie Hunte stumbled into a duet between Nina Simone and the sounds of protest outside her apartment. Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, 1968 - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tracie talks about what Nina's music, born during another time when our country was facing questions that seemed to have no answer, meant then and why it still resonates today.  Listen to Nina's brother, Samuel Waymon, talk about that April 7th concert here.