UT Southwestern researchers develop severity index for Alzheimer's disease

May 23, 2000

DALLAS - May 24, 2000 - UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas researchers have developed an easy, inexpensive index to measure the severity of Alzheimer's disease.

"The index correlates a simple lab test determining the amount of platelet Alzheimer's plaque protein (APP) in a syringe of blood with the most basic cognitive test in a significantly statistical ratio," said Dr. Fred Baskin, lead author of the study, which appears in the May 24 issue of the Journal of Neurology. Baskin is an associate professor of neurology and a researcher in UT Southwestern's Alzheimer's Disease Center (ADC).

The samples of APP were compared with a patient's score on the Mini-Mental State Exam at the beginning of the study and again after three years. The correlation of the cognitive vs. the physiological score clearly indicated a relationship between APP formation in the brain and the patient's mental decline.

Baskin said that the test also works as a marker. "But so far it works more effectively as a marker for the mid-to-severe stages of the disease than for early Alzheimer's disease," he said.

To make the index specific for Alzheimer's disease, the researchers used the blood test on comparative groups of patients, including eight suffering from Parkinson's disease and six stroke patients. Dr. Roger Rosenberg, director of the ADC and a member of the research group, said he and his colleagues previously reported that the APP processing in the platelets of patients with Alzheimer's disease is different from that of control subjects in a 1997 study published in the Archives of Neurology.
-end-
To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via e-mail, send a message to UTSWNEWS-REQUEST@listserv.swmed.edu. Leave the subject line blank and in the text box, type SUB UTSWNEWS

Eleven Alzheimer's patients in 10 Dallas-area nursing homes, who had been part of the earlier research, participated in the new study. Baskin said blood and cognitive tests were given to the Alzheimer's patients and to eight patients with Parkinson's disease and eight stroke patients, whose symptoms sometimes are similar to those seen with Alzheimer's disease. The scores from 11 of the control subjects tested in the 1997 study were reevaluated for use in the current study.

Rosenberg said he and his associates are excited about the possibilities the new research holds. They are planning to participate in upcoming national multi-center Alzheimer's study that will provide a larger group for testing.

Funding for the research was provided by the national Alzheimer's Association in conjunction with the Alzheimer's Association - Greater Dallas Chapter, the National Institute on Aging and the M.B. Rudman Foundation of Dallas.

"We are indeed grateful for their backing without which this important study could not have been pursued," said Rosenberg.

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Related Blood Test Articles from Brightsurf:

Breakthrough blood test developed for brain tumors
Genetic mutations that promote the growth of the most common type of adult brain tumors can be accurately detected and monitored in blood samples using an enhanced form of liquid biopsy developed by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

A blood test could predict who benefits from immunotherapy
A test which detects changing levels of tumour fragments in the blood may be an easy, non-invasive and quick way to predict who will benefit from immunotherapy, a treatment option for advanced cancers.

Diagnosing brain tumors with a blood test
A simple but highly sensitive blood test has been found to accurately diagnose and classify different types of brain tumours, resulting in more accurate diagnosis, less invasive methods and better treatment planning in the future for the patients.

Blood test may help predict whose MS will get worse
A blood test may help predict which people with multiple sclerosis (MS) will get worse during the following year, according to a study published in the May 20, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

New blood test for Alzheimer's developed
A new blood test for Alzheimer's disease has been developed under the leadership of researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Blood test for deadly eye melanoma
A simple blood test could soon become the latest monitoring tool for the early detection of melanoma in the eye.

Blood test could help to accelerate brain cancer diagnosis
A blood test which could help to accelerate the diagnosis of brain cancer has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

New blood test for detecting Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from Lund University, together with the Roche pharmaceutical company, have used a method to develop a new blood marker capable of detecting whether or not a person has Alzheimer's disease.

Coming soon: A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?
People with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cognitive difficulties, behavior changes and mood swings, may wait months or even years to get a definitive diagnosis.

Blood test for tau, Alzheimer's disease under development
Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital are working to develop a blood test to accurately diagnose or even predict Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear.

Read More: Blood Test News and Blood Test Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.