Al Gore and Tom Stoppard among 2008 Dan David Prize Winners at TAU

May 23, 2008

The seven 2008 Dan David Prize laureates, including Al Gore and Sir Tom Stoppard, were recognized for their impact on the world at a ceremony held May 19 at Tel Aviv University. Israeli President Shimon Peres gave the keynote address.

Laureates were selected based on their activities in the three time dimensions of past, present and future.

Al Gore: Our Present Responsibility to the Environment

Gore received the $1 million prize for his present work in Social Responsibility with Particular Emphasis on the Environment, due to his contribution to creating greater worldwide awareness of global climate change. Accepting the prize, Gore called on those concerned about the environment to demand that politicians to make a change to renewable sources of energy, such as solar power. What we need, Gore said, is "sufficient political will. But as the people of Israel know, sufficient political will is a renewable resource."

Honoring the "Creative Rendering of the Past"

Sharing the $1 million prize in the field of Creative Rendering of the Past - Literature, Theater, Film are filmmaker Atom Egoyan, author Amos Oz and playwright Stoppard.

Oz (Arad, Israel) was honored for his works emphasizing the individual and exploring conflicts between nations.

Stoppard (London) was recognized for his portrayal of the search for meaning while displaying dazzling theatricality and genius for laughter.

Egoyan (Toronto) was noted for his exploration of the human impact of historical events and the nature of truth and its representation through art.

Climate Change and Saving the Future

Three geoscientists were recognized with the $1 million Dan David Prize for their research affecting the future: "Climate change is one of today's most pressing issues and recognizing four of the seven winners in this area helps bring additional focus on the crisis," said Mr. Dan David, who founded the prize. "As we look toward saving our future, we cannot forget our past, and that past as portrayed in the arts is especially forceful - thus our prize for the past focuses on this area."

The Dan David Prize annually awards three prizes of $1 million each for achievements with an outstanding scientific, technological, cultural or social impact on our world. The Prize is headquartered at Tel Aviv University and is named after international entrepreneur and philanthropist Dan David.
-end-
American Friends of Tel Aviv University supports Israel's largest and most comprehensive center of higher learning. It is ranked among the world's top 100 universities in science, biomedical studies, and social science, and rated one of the world's top 200 universities overall. Internationally recognized for the scope and groundbreaking nature of its research programs, Tel Aviv University consistently produces work with profound implications for the future.

American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Related Climate Change Articles from Brightsurf:

Are climate scientists being too cautious when linking extreme weather to climate change?
Climate science has focused on avoiding false alarms when linking extreme events to climate change.

Mysterious climate change
New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past.

Mapping the path of climate change
Predicting a major transition, such as climate change, is extremely difficult, but the probabilistic framework developed by the authors is the first step in identifying the path between a shift in two environmental states.

Small change for climate change: Time to increase research funding to save the world
A new study shows that there is a huge disproportion in the level of funding for social science research into the greatest challenge in combating global warming -- how to get individuals and societies to overcome ingrained human habits to make the changes necessary to mitigate climate change.

Sub-national 'climate clubs' could offer key to combating climate change
'Climate clubs' offering membership for sub-national states, in addition to just countries, could speed up progress towards a globally harmonized climate change policy, which in turn offers a way to achieve stronger climate policies in all countries.

Review of Chinese atmospheric science research over the past 70 years: Climate and climate change
Over the past 70 years since the foundation of the People's Republic of China, Chinese scientists have made great contributions to various fields in the research of atmospheric sciences, which attracted worldwide attention.

A CERN for climate change
In a Perspective article appearing in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Tim Palmer (Oxford University), and Bjorn Stevens (Max Planck Society), critically reflect on the present state of Earth system modelling.

Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change
Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

Believing in climate change doesn't mean you are preparing for climate change, study finds
Notre Dame researchers found that although coastal homeowners may perceive a worsening of climate change-related hazards, these attitudes are largely unrelated to a homeowner's expectations of actual home damage.

Older forests resist change -- climate change, that is
Older forests in eastern North America are less vulnerable to climate change than younger forests, particularly for carbon storage, timber production, and biodiversity, new research finds.

Read More: Climate Change News and Climate Change Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.