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Should you pee on a jellyfish sting? (video)

May 23, 2017

WASHINGTON, May 23, 2017 -- Sure, jellyfish look pretty serene, but we all know the evils that come from a run-in with those tentacles. You've probably heard the rumor that peeing on a jellyfish sting can make the pain go away, but does this icky old wives tale stand up to science? Filmed at San Francisco's Aquarium of the Bay, the latest Reactions episode explains the fearsome chemistry of jellyfish stings, and debunks this age-old beach myth: https://youtu.be/KDj2t4-bn1g.
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