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Could there be life without carbon? (video)

May 23, 2019

WASHINGTON, May 23, 2019 -- One element is the backbone of all forms of life we've ever discovered on Earth: carbon. Number six on the periodic table is, to the best of our knowledge, impossible to live without. In this episode of Reactions, discover what makes carbon so exceptional, its nearly infinite capabilities and intergalactic implications: https://youtu.be/VUiDwrM2YPI.
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Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios. Subscribe to Reactions at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions.

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