Nav: Home

Piedmont Atlanta first in Georgia to offer new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema

May 23, 2019

Atlanta, Ga. (May 23, 2019) - Piedmont Atlanta Hospital is the first in the state of Georgia to offer a new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema, a severe form of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

The procedure improves patients' quality of life by allowing them to breathe easier, be less short of breath and be more active and energetic. The treatment, using the Zephyr® Valve System, is groundbreaking because it is the first FDA-approved procedure for emphysema that is minimally invasive, meaning no incision or cutting is required.

"This new treatment option is a life-changer for people with emphysema and severe COPD," said Ralitza Martin, M.D., an interventional pulmonologist with Piedmont Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine and the first physician in the state to perform this procedure. "Until now, the only other options for these patients were highly invasive treatments such as surgical lung volume reduction or lung transplantation. This minimally invasive procedure offers new hope for patients who remain symptomatic despite optimal medical care."

COPD and specifically emphysema is a progressive and life-threatening lung disease usually caused by smoking. There is no cure and patients live with severe shortness of breath. Simple daily activities like walking or taking a shower are often very difficult.

This extreme shortness of breath is caused when air becomes trapped in parts of the lung that are damaged by the disease. This trapped air causes the damaged areas of the lungs to get larger, which puts pressure on the healthy parts of the lungs and diaphragm. This procedure places tiny valves in the airways to block off the damaged areas of the lung so air is no longer trapped there, allowing the healthier parts of the lungs to expand so patients can breathe more easily.

"We've been doing this procedure for several months now and I have seen a dramatic improvement in the quality of life of patients who have been treated," said Dr. Martin. "It's incredibly rewarding to see patients who were previously unable to walk down a hallway regain the ability to go outside and spend time with family and friends."

In clinical studies, patients treated with the Zephyr® Valve System have been shown to breathe easier, be more active and energetic, be less short of breath and enjoy a significantly improved quality of life compared to untreated patients.
-end-
To learn more about the procedure visit pulmonx.com. To determine eligibility for the procedure, contact Piedmont Atlanta's Interventional Pulmonary team at InterventionalPulmonary@piedmont.org or call 404-605-3904.

Pulmonx

Related Emphysema Articles:

Emphysema treatment could be optimized using network modelling
A unique engineering perspective of emphysema progression in the lung suggests how mechanisms operating at the micromechanical scale could help to predict patient survival and quality of life following treatment -- according to new research published in PLOS Computational Biology.
Sugar element of keratan sulfate halts the progress of emphysema
Using a mouse model, scientists from the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology and a number of other institutes have identified a sugar molecule that reduced the inflammatory response and progress of emphysema, a common component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
New targeted gene therapy could lead to improved treatment for emphysema
Researchers have developed a new strategy using lung-targeted gene therapy that may lead to improved treatments for inherited diseases including emphysema.
Tiny coils improve quality of life for patients with severe emphysema
Results from a large international trial were presented by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting in San Francisco.
From genes to latrines: Vikings and their worms provide clues to emphysema
In a paper published today in Nature: Scientific Reports a group of researchers led by LSTM have found that the key to an inherited deficiency, predisposing people to emphysema and other lung conditions, could lie in their Viking roots.
More Emphysema News and Emphysema Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...