Muscle derived cell transplants offer alternative incontinence therapy says Pitt study

May 25, 2002

ORLANDO, May 25 - Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have found that, in animal models, autologous skeletal muscle derived cell (MDC) transplants offer a safer, more effective and longer lasting treatment for urinary incontinence than existing methods. In the procedure, muscle cells are taken from the individual, purified and cloned, and then reinjected into the bladder.

"In patients who need more advanced treatments for incontinence, we currently have the options of treating them through surgery or through the injection of bulking agents like collagen. Although collagen injections give good short-term results and are less invasive than surgery, there is a possibility of the collagen being reabsorbed or causing allergic reactions," said Ryan J. Pruchnic, of the departments of urology and orthopaedic surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and lead author of the study. "In our study, MDCs have the potential to offer a longer-term solution without the risk of rejection."

Pruchnic and colleagues presented these findings today at the Centennial Celebration Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA). Results are published in abstract 131 in the AUA proceedings.

In the study, researchers obtained a mixed population of MDCs from a mouse skeletal muscle biopsy. The cells were purified to obtain a population that was purely myogenic - meaning that the cells were from muscle and capable of producing muscle. One cell from this population was then genetically engineered and cloned to form a large population. These cells were then injected into the bladder walls of mice.

The bladders of the mice were evaluated at one, four and eight weeks and 6 months. On evaluation, researchers noted the presence of myofibers, or differentiated muscle cells, throughout the smooth muscle layer, the number of which did not significantly decrease over time. Some of the myofibers expressed a-smooth muscle actin, suggesting differentiation of the cells into smooth muscle. Researchers also observed the presence of neuromuscular junctions, indicating that the muscle was supplied with nerves giving the muscle the ability to become functional tissue.

"These findings indicate that the use of MDCs may prove to be a very promising new therapy in the treatment of urinary incontinence. Essentially, we are giving the bladder muscles the ability to fix themselves by generating new muscle," said Michael Chancellor, M.D., professor of urology and gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. "In future studies we hope this will turn into a long lasting, if not permanent, solution for our patients."

Urinary incontinence affects 13 million Americans and is typified by the inability to control the flow of urine. Incontinence can be caused by a number of different anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic factors and can be temporary or chronic. The ability to control bladder function relies on the combined function of the smooth muscle tissue of the urethra and bladder, skeletal muscle and the nervous system.
-end-
CONTACT:
Jocelyn Uhl
Frank Raczkiewicz
PHONE: (412) 647-3555
FAX: (412) 624-3184
E-MAIL:
UhlJH@msx.upmc.edu
RaczkiewiczFA@msx.upmc.edu

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Related Incontinence Articles from Brightsurf:

Higher risk of future fecal incontinence after sphincter injuries
The risk of subsequent fecal incontinence and intestinal gas leakage is significantly higher among women who, during childbirth, have suffered a sphincter injury and consequent damage to the anal sphincter muscle, was shown in a new study from the University of Gothenburg.

Kegels: Underused by women to treat and prevent urinary incontinence
Kegels are underused to treat and prevent urinary incontinence, especially during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

Magnetic stimulation dramatically improves fecal incontinence
Painless magnetic stimulation of nerves that regulate muscles in the anus and rectum appears to improve their function and dramatically reduce episodes of fecal incontinence, a debilitating problem affecting about 10% of the population, investigators report.

Does adding therapy before, after surgery for urinary incontinence help?
Adding behavioral and physical therapy before and after surgery for women with stress and urgency urinary incontinence resulted in a small improvement in symptoms compared to women who just had surgery but that difference in symptoms may not be clinically important.

Study shows advantages for stress urinary incontinence surgery
One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic researchers.

Childbirth delivery methods and risk of incontinence, overactive bladder
Pelvic floor disorders such as urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse (when one or more of theĀ pelvic organsĀ drop from their normal position) are associated with childbirth and affect millions of women in the United States.

Poll: Half of women over 50 experience incontinence, but most haven't talked to a doctor
Nearly half of women over 50 say they sometimes leak urine according to a new national poll.

Getting relief from sexual dysfunction and incontinence caused by menopause
Microablative fractional CO2 lasers are energy-based devices designed to help manage troublesome menopause symptoms such as painful sex, dryness, itching/burning, urinary frequency, and incontinence.

Overweight and obesity linked to higher risk of urinary incontinence for women
Being overweight or obese is linked with an increased risk of developing urinary incontinence for young to mid-aged women, according to an Obesity Reviews analysis of all relevant published studies.

WPSI says screen all women annually for urinary incontinence
All women should be screened annually for urinary incontinence, according to new guidelines from the Women's Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI).

Read More: Incontinence News and Incontinence Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.