Nav: Home

Monitoring sun exposure with a portable paper sensor

May 25, 2016

Summer is around the corner -- time for cookouts and sunbathing. But too much sun can result in sunburn, which is the main cause of skin cancer. Because the time it takes to get burned depends on many factors, it is not easy to tell when to seek shade. To help people stay safe, researchers report in ACS Sensors the development of a paper-based sensor for monitoring sun exposure given different skin tones and sunscreen levels.

Most currently available UV sensors require high-tech gadgets to operate, such as smartphones or wearable devices. Recently, single-use, disposable sunburn sensors have come onto the market. However, some of these sensors use substances that are potentially harmful to people or the environment. Others are only good for specific skin tones. Thus, J. Justin Gooding and colleagues set out to create a disposable sunburn sensor that is inexpensive, is composed entirely of safe and benign materials and can be easily calibrated to take into account different skin tones and SPFs of sunscreens that are applied on the skin.

The group created a sun-exposure sensor by inkjet printing titanium dioxide, a nontoxic and inexpensive compound, and a food dye on paper. When enough UV radiation hits the sensor, titanium dioxide causes the dye to change color, warning people to get out of the sun or apply more sunscreen. To adjust the sensor for various skin tones and sunscreen use, the group added UV neutral density filters that can speed up or slow down the discoloration time of the sensor.
-end-
The researchers acknowledge funding from the Australian Research Council Centres of Excellence funding scheme.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society

Related Skin Cancer Articles:

Research reveals potential dangers during skin-to-skin contact for mother and baby following cesarean section birth
Research in the latest edition of the European Journal of Anaesthesiology (the official journal of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) reports the potential dangers of allowing skin-to-skin contact for mother and baby in the operating room, following a cesarean section birth.
Helping skin cells differentiate could be key to treating common skin cancer
A new study from Penn researchers has identified the key regulator that controls how the skin replaces itself and which can determine if cells turn into cancer.
Protein linked to aggressive skin cancer
Almost 300,000 people worldwide develop malignant melanoma each year. The disease is the most serious form of skin cancer and the number of cases reported annually is increasing, making skin cancer one of Sweden's most common forms of cancer.
What if you could spot skin cancer before it got too serious?
Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States.
Unraveling the genetic causes of skin cancer
American University Associate Professor of Biology Katie DeCicco-Skinner and her colleagues are helping to identify the genetic factors that lead to squamous cell carcinoma.
For preterm infants, skin-to-skin contact affects
For premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), skin-to-skin contact with parents influences levels of hormones related to mother-infant attachment (oxytocin) and stress (cortisol) -- and may increase parents' level of engagement with their infants, reports a study in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses.
How skin begins: New research could improve skin grafts, and more
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered a key mechanism by which skin begins to develop in embryos.
Parent cleansing paramount prior to skin-to-skin care
Neonatal intensive care units increasingly encourage meaningful touch and skin-to-skin care -- aka 'kangaroo care' -- between parents and premature babies to aid the babies' development.
Frequency of skin cancer screening among indoor tanners
Skin cancer screening is underused by indoor tanners.
Beneficial skin bacteria protect against skin cancer
Science continues to peel away layers of the skin microbiome to reveal its protective properties.
More Skin Cancer News and Skin Cancer Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab