Nav: Home

Migration back to Africa took place during the Paleolithic

May 26, 2016

The Palaeogenomics study conducted by the Human Evolutionary Biology group of the Faculty of Science and Technology, led by Concepción de la Rua, in collaboration with researchers in Sweden, the Netherlands and Romania, has made it possible to retrieve the complete sequence of the mitogenome of the Pestera Muierii woman(PM1)using two teeth. This mitochondrial genome corresponds to the now disappeared U6 basal lineage, and it is from this lineage that the U6 lineages, now existing mainly in the populations of the north of Africa, descend from.

So the study has not only made it possible to confirm the Eurasian origin of the U6 lineage but also to support the hypothesis that some populations embarked on a back-migration to Africa from Eurasia at the start of the Upper Palaeolithic, about 40-45,000 years ago. The Pestera Muierii individual represents one branch of this return journey to Africa of which there is no direct evidence owing to the lack of Palaeolithic fossil remains in the north of Africa.

"Right now, the research group is analysing the nuclear genome the results of which could provide us with information about its relationship with the Neanderthals and about the existence of genomic variations associated with the immune system that accounts for the evolutionary success of Homo sapiens over other human species with whom it co-existed. What is more, we will be able to see what the phenotypic features of early Homo sapiens were like, and also see how population movements in the past influence the understanding of our evolutionary history," explained Prof Concepción de la Rúa.

-end-

Bibliographical reference

M. Hervella, E.M. Svensson, A. Alberdi, T. Günther, N. Izagirre, A.R. Munters, S. Alonso, M. Ioana, 5, F. Ridiche, A. Soficaru, M. Jakobsson, M.G. Netea & C. de-la-Rua The mitogenome of a 35,000-year-old Homo sapiens from Europe supports a Palaeolithic back-migration to Africa. Scientific Reports DOI: 10.1038/srep25501

University of the Basque Country
ESMO Summit Africa 2017
The ESMO Summit Africa is a three-day educational event with presentations focused on several key disease sites.
Three new bird species discovered in Africa
Three never before documented bird species have been found in Africa, and researchers say there could well be more.
A step towards palliative care policy in Africa
ecancer's latest Special Issue provides an update on rapidly evolving developments in palliative cancer care in Africa.
Migration back to Africa took place during the Paleolithic
The UPV/EHU's Human Evolutionary Biology group has managed to retrieve the mitochondrial genome of a fossil 35,000 years old found in the Pestera Muierii cave in Romania.
Feeling the pulse of Africa
The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) sent 10 students to the PanAfrican Legume Conference and World Cowpea Conference in Livingstone, Zambia.
Confronting diseases in Africa
The Society for Public Health Education proudly announces the publication of Health Education & Behavior's supplement, 'Noncommunicable Diseases in Africa and the Global South.' Co-edited by Collins Airhihenbuwa, PhD, and Gbenga Ogedegbe, MD, the supplement includes 13 peer-reviewed articles devoted to the rise of noncommunicable diseases in Africa and other regions in the Global South and promising solutions to prevent and reduce the prevalence of chronic diseases.
Finding the best seeds to match Africa's needs
USAID's 'Feed the Future' Soybean Innovation Lab at the University of Illinois, African Agricultural Technology Foundation, and the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture (SFSA) There is no third-party soybean variety testing in Africa.
Divorce: On the decline in sub-Saharan Africa
With education, employment and income levels all rising for women in sub-Saharan Africa, many observers have speculated that divorce rates would follow suit -- as they have in much of the developed world.
Africa's future -- can biosciences help?
A new collection of assays launched at the World Food Prize 2015 examines the barriers to the use of bioscience techniques by Sub-Sahara African smallholder farmers and how if overcome this could help meet the challenge of SDG2 to end hunger.
New Sesotho-named dinosaur from South Africa
South African and Argentinian palaeontologists have discovered a new 200-million-year-old dinosaur from South Africa hidden for decades among the largest fossil collection in South Africa at the Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits University.

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.

Now Playing: Radiolab

Truth Trolls
Today, a third story of folks relentlessly searching for the truth. But this time, the truth seekers are an unlikely bunch... internet trolls.


Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking School
For most of modern history, humans have placed smaller humans in institutions called schools. But what parts of this model still work? And what must change? This hour, TED speakers rethink education.TED speakers include teacher Tyler DeWitt, social entrepreneur Sal Khan, international education expert Andreas Schleicher, and educator Linda Cliatt-Wayman.