BUMC, BMC receives Clinical and Translational Science Award from NIH

May 29, 2008

Boston, MA--The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded one of 14 Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) for 2008 to a team based at Boston University Medical (BUMC) and Charles River Campuses and Boston Medical Center (BMC). These awards, together with 12 CTSAs awarded in 2007, and 12 awarded in 2006, form the core of an NIH effort to build a national consortium of select centers that will "transform how clinical and translational research is conducted," ultimately enabling researchers to provide new and better treatments more efficiently and quickly to patients.

The Boston University Clinical and Translational Science (BU-BRIDGE) Institute will integrate, connect and expand research and programs across traditional academic departments and schools. The institute will be a bridge between disciplines to facilitate interactions by incorporating multiple key programs that support the university-wide commitment to a home for translational research.

"The BU-BRIDGE Institute will build on a strong foundation of relationships and trust that presently exists. Moreover, we expect the Institute and its community engagement function to have a transformative effect on clinical and translational research at BUMC by infusing community-based needs and perspectives throughout the Institute's work," said David Center, MD, principal investigator for this project and associate provost for Translational Research, the Gordon and Ruth Snider Professor of Pulmonary Medicine at BUSM and Chief, Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine at BMC.

"Importantly, the Institute will provide the administrative structure and process, as well as financial resources, to significantly extend and enhance our successful partnering with our community," Center added.

The CTSA will allow the Institute to build on existing strengths to create an environment linking faculty, trainees and university programs to speed the translation of innovations in medical science to improve maintenance of health and diagnosis and treatment of diseases and share these innovations with other University based Clinical and Translational Science Institute's. The BU-BRIDGE environment will also support the bi-directional development and translation of ideas that begin in the clinic to the BU scientific community and back to identify new ways to improve health and delivery of health care services. Moreover, the Institute will significantly enhance existing partnerships with Boston's community health centers, transforming the conduct of clinical and translational research by infusing it with community based perspectives and needs.

"Our program is a confirmation of the close collaboration among the three Boston University Medical Campus schools, Boston Medical Center, the Boston HealthNet Health Centers and Boston University's Charles River Campus," said Karen Antman, MD, dean of Boston University School of Medicine and provost of Boston University Medical Campus.

"With more than half of NIH's funding allocated for basic research, the CTSA consortium is perfectly poised to help move discoveries in the laboratory to improved patient care. The consortium serves as the bridge in this process that allows researchers to perfect and refine existing treatments through interdisciplinary teams that extend to the clinic and community," said NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, MD. "Through the consortium, we are better able to leverage expertise and resources across the CTSA institutions, and ultimately maximize NIH's investment in basic research, which should remain a top priority."
-end-
BUMC and BMC have a long and rich history of engagement with its community, including serving as Boston's safety-net health care provider and in its leadership role in community-based care through the Boston HealthNet, a partnership among BUMC and Boston's community health centers. This longstanding relationship includes the provision of health care and also training physicians and dentists, and conducting community-based clinical and translational research.

Participating Institutions and Community Partners:

Boston University
Boston Medical Center
Veterans Administration, Boston Healthcare System
Framingham Heart Study
Boston HealthNet
National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories
Northeast Center for Research to Evaluate & Eliminate Dental Disparities
Partners in Health and Housing Prevention Research Center

Boston University

Related Health Articles from Brightsurf:

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff.

Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs
Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.

New measure of social determinants of health may improve cardiovascular health assessment
The authors of this study developed a single risk score derived from multiple social determinants of health that predicts county-level cardiovascular disease mortality.

BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality.

Electronic health information exchange improves public health disease reporting
Disease tracking is an important area of focus for health departments in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities
Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting.

Mental health outcomes among health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and insomnia among health care workers in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study.

Mental health of health care workers in china in hospitals with patients with COVID-19
This survey study of almost 1,300 health care workers in China at 34 hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 reports on their mental health outcomes, including symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia and distress.

Health records pin broad set of health risks on genetic premutation
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Marshfield Clinic have found that there may be a much broader health risk to carriers of the FMR1 premutation, with potentially dozens of clinical conditions that can be ascribed directly to carrying it.

Attitudes about health affect how older adults engage with negative health news
To get older adults to pay attention to important health information, preface it with the good news about their health.

Read More: Health News and Health Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.