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June 2007 issue of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine focuses on contrast-enhanced ultrasound

May 30, 2007

The June 2007 issue of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine (JUM) will contain substantial content focusing on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). Published by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM), this issue will include an overview on the state of CEUS in the United States, the AIUM's recommendations to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for contrast-enhanced liver ultrasound, a glossary of CEUS terminology, and several articles focusing on CEUS.

In recent history, the AIUM has championed the cause to obtain approval for the use of CEUS in the United States. Under the leadership of Lennard Greenbaum, MD, immediate past president of the AIUM, a dialog has been established with the FDA to encourage the review and approval of clinical use of ultrasound contrast agents, and the AIUM is currently working toward the approval of new clinical trials for CEUS. Although CEUS is used effectively throughout the world, it has only been approved for heart chamber opacification and delineation of endocardial borders in the United States. It is the AIUM's belief that the current lack of ultrasound contrast available potentially hinders the delivery of optimal diagnostic imaging, resulting in an adverse impact on clinical care to our patients.

This issue of the JUM is intended to support and encourage the endeavors of those who are seeking the rapid approval of ultrasound contrast agent clinical applications in the United States. JUM Editor-in-Chief Beryl Benacerraf commented, "Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is one of the most important advances in ultrasound and cross-sectional imaging in recent years and the papers in this issue of JUM demonstrate some of the exciting applications of CEUS for the future."
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For additional information about the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, visit www.jultrasoundmed.org.

The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine is a multidisciplinary association dedicated to advancing the safe and effective use of ultrasound in medicine through professional and public education, research, development of guidelines, and accreditation.

American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine

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